or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:

Posts by il_colonnello

I'm not looking to have a suit made this time, only shirts. Can you speak to a possible difference in shirts between Chan and Sam's Shanghai? Or are the prices for shirts perhaps the same, if the workshops are both run by Chan?
Is there a relation between them or are the names just a coincidence? I might be in Shanghai for a couple of weeks later this month or next. The search function seems to yield a somewhat general consensus that non-HKG China is awful for tailoring, except for W.W. Chan Shanghai and possibly Sam's. I had a shirt made by Sam's in HKG earlier this year and was not overly thrilled with the result, although their fitting rooms are literally plastered with pictures of heads...
Quote: Originally Posted by suited&booted I hope it's okay for me to hazard my 2 cents on this thread. What could have been an educational and enjoyable discussion has been marred by ugly racial epithets disguised as humour. However I'm glad and encouraged by the numerous postings condemning the offending post and at the same time giving their experiences about Peter Lee and the other HK tailors. Grace under fire is a worthy mark of a gentleman from...
Quote: Originally Posted by the_sartorialist Really? He speaks 'Myanmar'? I believe the language and nationality in both instances is referred to as 'Burmese'. That only makes you laugh because you aren't used to it. "Burmese" ist one of the two adjectives that go with the noun Burma (the other being "Burman"). The fact is, English has no adjective that corresponds to the noun Myanmar. So using "Myanmar" to refer to the language...
Quote: Originally Posted by Frodo Irishman. Scotsman. Welshman. Indiaman. (OK, that's a ship. Bad example.) But: Mexican. Algerian. Uruguayan. A person can be Chinese, but can they also be "a Chinese"? A person can be Scottish, but can they also be "a Scottish?" It's just convention. I don't think it's convention but clear and simple rules of English: English has three ways of referring to people and nationalities. For most...
Quote: Originally Posted by Valor Google translate, the definitive source for subtleties of language. Exactly. I was going to say that, too.
Quote: Originally Posted by AriGold I think it looks great. Young people can pull this off alot better than older guys I guess and you'd have to be in good shape. I'm an athletic build 6'2" and 190lbs, and i don't find it uncomfortable at all with a shirt that slim - but it is neccesary to have high arm holes to allow comfortable movement. Looks great, and if you are in great shape does not look feminine at all. TOO TIGHT: SLIM...
A native of China is, quite simply, a Chinese. No need to add a term like "fellow", "person" or anything else. Just like a native of Germany is a German, a native of Canada a Canadian and a native of America an American. You don't go around referring to people as Germanymen, Canadamen and Americamen. Chinaman is false English (as would be Chineseman obviously). +1 on Svenn's distinction between adjectives and nouns.
I have a couple of shirts that fit like that. Great as long as you hardly ever move your limbs.
Honestly, if 20 euros per person per meal is your budget I don't think there is anything to worry about. That isn't even shoestring-budget travelling, certainly not in Berlin anyway. Forget getting groceries from supermarkets. All areas of Berlin I've ever been to are rife with restaurants where you can eat for less than that - throw a stone and you'll hit one. That said, if you go to Hackescher Markt - which I assume you will, who doesn't? - there is a very small...
New Posts  All Forums: