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Posts by kirbya

Haha. Yes. I wore gloves. Disclaimer: These were a customer's shoes!
I'd honestly just try a few coats of polish on this to soften it up. Maybe, just maybe, take some very fine sand paper to smooth the leather. But shoe polish should be able to conceal 90% of that scratch. It doesn't look deep enough to warrant using the Renovating Repair Cream.
The Renovator Repair Cream... it applies like a cream (has the consistency of cream) but dries hard. Once it dries, it can only be removed with the Reno'Mat. It is a "permanent solution" for damage.Below is a before and after of a pretty badly damaged pair of shoes. After I applied the Renovator Repair Cream, I also added a few coats of cream and wax polish to build up the surface on top of the Renovator Repair Cream.
couldn't see the pics since the auction ended. Shouldn't be that difficult to fix, though.
It's safe.
Wow. I can't believe John Lobb is making their shoes in China! This is incredulous.
What's the ballpark on a basic lace up in calfskin?
Does anyone know what the pricing structure is for John Lobb London? Do they charge a "last fee" for them to make your first pair of shoes? Or is the price the same for your second pair as it is your first?
Only thing missing is a picture of Mr. Field!
Ha. To say that your shoes need to be resoled is an understatement! They should have been resoled a year ago.I just had a pair of shoes resoled by B. Nelsons. You can read about it here: http://www.hangerproject.com/closet/blog/dress-shoe-sole-replacement/I was pretty happy. The high-end JR soles cost about $150 all-in. Great quality and much quicker turn-around than if you sent them back to the factory.This just means that when shoe is re-stretched over the original last...
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