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Posts by epb

Depends on the highway, depends on the ride. I've got a Honda CBR600RR, CB400T, and NT650. The CB400T, like otc said (he's got one as well), is about 35hp and has a top speed of 99mph; it hits the meat of its torque-band above 5000 rpm. I've ridden it to Milwaukee, but I do that by taking Route 43 way north of Chicago where it merges with I-94, and I can cruise along at 70mph. I'm keeping up with traffic, and if I need some more a (BIG) twist of the wrist will move it...
I go ridiculously easy on the turns because the street is the street, not the track - you simply don't know what's on the street. I've come close to losing my bike on turns due to broken glass, diesel, at least a Super Gulp-sized Slurpee, a puddle of what I still think was maple syrup, and a clear sheet of plastic that was invisible until my front tire touched it. (Funny how after a close call, you always go back and see what the hell it was). Yes, I feel like an idiot...
Thanks for the follow-up.
The GB500 had the same problem as my NT650 - it pre-dated it's trend. People would scoop them up in droves now, with the retro/cafe craze, and the Hawk GT arrived years before naked bikes came into their own with the Monster. Same thing happened to Kawasaki with the W650 - it missed the wave of retros. My thinking is that Honda may be too late to the game with the CB1100.
Off to check out The Family today. I'm hoping to like it better than Riddick, which was somewhat disappointing; they tried to capture the spirit of Pitch Black by making a re-make of Pitch Black. Some friends want to head out tomorrow night to see At World's End.
I don't think I've ever seen a t-bird or speedmaster in the wild. Chicago's crawling with Bonnies, Striples and the like but cruisers, not so much.
The American public has steadfastly refused to buy any Japanese bike with character for decades. They make them, the press raves, and we all go get another Sportster. Watch how things go with the CB1100.
This attitude baffles me. Buying a car typically means dealing with some depreciation - faced with that reality, the sensible thing to do is pick something that depreciates as little as possible. People manage expenses in most every aspect of their lives, but car enthusiasts (in the US) seem to always throw up their hands at the idea of managing depreciation. It's something of a crap shoot, sure, but it's worth the attempt.
2013 minus 5 is?
From that perspective, and assuming it's something I'd also enjoy driving: BMW 1M.
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