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Posts by Violinist

Quote: Originally Posted by Manton Where is that from? He also famously said that democracy was the worst form of government, except for all the others. I don't think that first quote -- assuming it is real -- is that big a deal. Well, it's an extremely elitist thing to say, especially comming from a man who countless historians have noted was a person who thought he was better than pretty much everyone in his circle, so can you imagine...
Quote: Originally Posted by Manton but he never expressed any condescension about the "ordinary" Englishman of his time. To the contrary, he admired the English everyman a great deal. "The best argument against democracy is a five-minute conversation with the average voter."
Quote: Originally Posted by Manton I deny this. Hopefully, when you are five years removed from Brandeis, you will see the folly in it, too. I realize that is too much to expect now, however. It's been some time since I've read about Churchill but I do recall him having said stupid, extremely elitist things. Just remember, that people in the passed have not been put up to the kind of scrutiny that Obama has, by the sheer nature of media...
Quote: Originally Posted by Manton I'm sorry, but Obama's explanation of what he "really" meant -- brilliant though it is as a piece of spin -- is prepersterously phony. For a guy who is supposed to be the Great Orator of Our Age (and I admit that I have been impressed by many of his speeches) he is sure letting his mouth get him into trouble a lot lately. wow and like great orators of the passed haven't done idiotic things like that? Great...
Quote: Originally Posted by Dragon I guess I`m only the one that thinks there is no rule. I meant the subway, the mall, anywhere. You really, really are the only one.
Quote: Originally Posted by iammatt Yeah, I like bleached oak even less (less even when somebody calls it cerused). The use of these kinds of woods in a modern context doesn't work at all for me. The attraction to modernity, at least for me, is as much the use of innovative materials as it is the absolute design. When you slap "warm" woods on to it, I get the feeling of somebody who heard modern was the cool way to go, but didn't really want to live...
Quote: Originally Posted by iammatt Solid wood is not the best idea in a kitchen. The heat and humidity change too much. Anyway, veneer has always been the choice for fine furniture and cabinetry, with solid wood being more for peasants. The only thing that has really changed over the last many years is the surface below the veneer. As to something earlier, I hate wenge and don't understand the attraction to it at all. When we first moved in to our...
Quote: Originally Posted by LabelKing It seems many mid-century buildings used a variety of particle board and copious amounts of fancy veneers. yea exactly. Particle board and plywood with some cheesy veneer.
Quote: Originally Posted by LabelKing If anything the '70s are underrated. People who are into Modernism have a fetish for the '50s and '60s and many tend to look down on the '70s as tacky or plain ugly. This is especially true of "Modernist capitals" like LA. My idea of the perfect compromise of what you call sterile modernism and "warmth" are the designs of Edward Durell Stone: I admit I have a particular fascination for strictness and...
brocolli.... chicken breast... Vitamin D
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