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Posts by Violinist

Quote: Originally Posted by LabelKing I suppose the solid wood furniture for the peasants is more in line with traditional European furnishings. That certainly seemed to be the case with French furniture--the now ubiquitous French provincial styles all tended to favor solid woods while the grand pieces were composed of complex veneers and things like ivory and tortoise-shell with bronze inlays. Of course, with things like sofas, chairs, etc. solid wood...
Quote: Originally Posted by Dragon I guess I`m only the one that thinks there is no rule. I meant the subway, the mall, anywhere. You really, really are the only one.
Quote: Originally Posted by iammatt Yeah, I like bleached oak even less (less even when somebody calls it cerused). The use of these kinds of woods in a modern context doesn't work at all for me. The attraction to modernity, at least for me, is as much the use of innovative materials as it is the absolute design. When you slap "warm" woods on to it, I get the feeling of somebody who heard modern was the cool way to go, but didn't really want to live...
Quote: Originally Posted by iammatt Solid wood is not the best idea in a kitchen. The heat and humidity change too much. Anyway, veneer has always been the choice for fine furniture and cabinetry, with solid wood being more for peasants. The only thing that has really changed over the last many years is the surface below the veneer. As to something earlier, I hate wenge and don't understand the attraction to it at all. When we first moved in to our...
Quote: Originally Posted by LabelKing It seems many mid-century buildings used a variety of particle board and copious amounts of fancy veneers. yea exactly. Particle board and plywood with some cheesy veneer.
Quote: Originally Posted by LabelKing If anything the '70s are underrated. People who are into Modernism have a fetish for the '50s and '60s and many tend to look down on the '70s as tacky or plain ugly. This is especially true of "Modernist capitals" like LA. My idea of the perfect compromise of what you call sterile modernism and "warmth" are the designs of Edward Durell Stone: I admit I have a particular fascination for strictness and...
brocolli.... chicken breast... Vitamin D
I have very thick hair and want to be able to manipulate my hair without it appearing or feeling greasy. Is there anything which is a decent substitute for your own natural oils? I want something extremely subtle. I have tried that Bed Head stuff (too goey and thick), this Kerastase hair wax (makes hair way too shiny and the hold doesn't feel natural), and this Redken stuff which was like a white paste, but it wasn't so grainy. I kind of liked it since it doesn't make...
Quote: Originally Posted by iammatt I couple of years ago I read a very interesting article about this phenomenon. It was based on Le Corbusier's idea of "period" versus modern and excoriated people for doing exactly what you say. "Modern," when referring to 1920-60s furniture is now nothing but another form of "period," and one wonders what the original modernists would think about that. I don't imagine they'd look on said ignorance...
Quote: Originally Posted by iammatt I've never bought into the universality of cold and warm in design. To me, there is nothing more sterile feeling than a newly built house done in the classic style. It just smells of trying to be something that no longer is. Of course, I am biased having been brought up with a heavy dose of modernism, so it is what feels natural and comforting to me. On the other hand, I am no fan of wood kitchens. I think they...
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