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Posts by JustinW

Do you want one? Are you free of any felony convictions and a safe, mature and responsible adult willing to learn and practice firearms safety along with the other shooting skills?
Been there, done that:
RIP
There's a guy posting in CE with a total post count of 32. Has the bar been lowered?
No worries. If I wasn't vetting the sick parades on the parade ground in my army days, I was usually on the colour party. More recently, I've been given responsibility for the flags at my work - so had to look for any differences in American and Australian flag etiquette (there are surprisingly few - though the folding is one of them).This will help you fold it for the shadow box: http://www.usflag.org/foldflag.htmlNot that I expect anyone to care, but the Australian flag...
A correctly folder flag in a suitable shadowbox would be very appropriate for any national flag. There is nothing inherently 'military' about it. Also, when correctly folded and displayed thus, you are exempt from the usual rules of keeping it illuminated at all times.
Thanks. So far I am liking it a lot - though I have only put 50rds through it ... and that was for my CHL requal! I had great plans to get to the range with the AUG and PX4SC last week while I was off, but it never happened.I watched some used models but ended-up buying new for $465 with shipping from Jet Guns.I'm still hoping the safety will loosen-up a bit with time and repeated manipulation.I'd like that!!
+ 1Speaking of .....In the Australian Army and US Navy, combat medics & corpsmen are traditionally referred to as 'Doc' . Usually 'Doc Something'. For a while I was 'Doc Rabbit' (I bounced too much when going forward under cover to treat casualties on the training field. Later I was 'Doc Feelgood' after taking an interest in trauma anesthesiology and dishing out the hypothetical morphine on training exercises a little too liberally. There were some much cooler nicknames,...
I would stay with "former Sergeant Joe Blow ....." or simply "Joe blow was a Sergeant in the 2/3rd Remmington Raiders from 1988-1991 ..."To earn the use of Sgt. Joe Blow (ret) one must, not surprisingly, have retired from the service (usually 20 years time-in or early retirement due to a combat wound.+ 1I did overhear someone ask an American Marine when he was "discharged from the corpse" .
Thanks G-Man. Clearly I am not running on all cylinders today!
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