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Posts by jcusey

Sadie Family Wines. All of them that you can get your hands on.
Well, different strokes, I guess. I've had the regular bottling several times and have always loved it. It's more tutti-fruiti and carbonic-like (although I don't think it sees carbonic maceration), while the Finca Meixeman has more of an herbal core underneath.
I had a couple of very nice wines this weekend. (Not my image.) Alheit Vineyards is another one of these new South African producers similar in style and approach to Eben Sadie: they buy their grapes (typically from under-appreciated or unpopular varieties) from dry-farmed bush vineyards at (relatively) low potential alcohols and produce distinctive wines that are unmistakably New World but still restrained. Cartology is Alheit's "villiage" offering, made with grapes...
I've had a couple of really nice wines this week. (Not my picture.) 100% Blaufrankisch. As the label says, Jagini Zagersdorf is a joint effort of Roland Velich of Moric and Hannes Schuster of Rosi Schuster: Shuster grows the grapes, Velich makes the wine. It was very bretty at first, but that dissipated. Iit's bigger than the regular Moric Blaufrankisch bottling, but it has a similar medium-weight, high-acid profile, with lots of fruit and minerals and forest floor and...
Well, Toro isn't that far down the Duero from Ribera del Duero...If Principle means Ribera del Duero, I have had good experiences with wines from Emilio Moro and Psi. (Psi has one of my favorite wine labels -- distinctive and very well done.)If he means Toro, one of the best-known producers is Numanthia, although they're not really to my taste: big, extracted, alcoholic, and oaky.
Which bottling?(Apropos of your request for riesling recommendations last week, Vajra makes a really good one, strangely enough. Who knew there was riesling in the Langhe? It's a bit pricey, though.)
Had the 2014 version of this yesterday: (Not my picture.) One of the more enjoyable wine "discoveries" I have made over the past couple of years has been Semillon from Brokenwood in the Hunter Valley in Australia. It's not at all what you would expect from an Australian white if you haven't done much experimenting: it's high-acid and low alcohol and sees no oak: just a refreshing, characterful wine that's also pretty inexpensive. The Sadie Kokerboom (which is a blend...
With the caveat that I have not had either of these wines specifically but have had others from the same brand (in one case) or producer (in the other) that I thought were very good:1. Scarpetta -- this is Bobby Stuckey's label, and all the wines I have had from it (Friulano, the rosato spumante, and the Barbera) have been very nice and well-priced. I think the Pinot Grigio is priced in the high teens.2. Venica & Venica -- a well-respected producer from Friuli. I have...
Maybe De Margerie?We had a Le Mesnil brut NV (produced by the Union des Proprietaires Recoltants co-op in Le Mesnil sur Oger) and an '04 Pierre Gimonnet Special Club. The Le Mesnil was not earth-shaking, but it was everything a good BdB Champagne should be. It was also very, very cheap (for Champagne). I really like Gimonnet in general, but this bottle didn't do much for me. If I can find another bottle, I'll try again to see if I was just off.Also had an '07 Pierre Peters...
You can get the basic Huet for around $30, I think. Champalou, imported by Kermit Lynch, is also pretty reliable and should be closer to $20 than $30.
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