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Posts by jcusey

It's Steen, although most of what I see these days is labeled Chenin./pedantryI agree with you about Pinotage. I've never had one that I could tolerate. They're no bargain, but I really like what Sadie Family Wines and Alheit are doing in South Africa. They're both making a lot of field blends from old vines, including some varieties that you rarely see (eg, Palomino, Tinto Barocca, and Semillon), and they're very good.Serge Hochar from Chateau Musar. It's very old...
I think my cost basis was around $65 per bottle. As you say, it's possible to get really good Champagne for that price, so I can't really defend the value proposition. Still, this is very different from any Champagne that I've ever had, and it's very good in its own right. I wish it had been cheaper, but I don't regret buying it; and if the other two wines in this offering are anything like this one, I'll buy again next year.
Love Lauer. I haven't seen this particular bottling, but I've loved everything that I have ever had from them. The basic Barrel X bottling (feinherb!) is one of the best QPR wines I know.Some recent wines (all images stolen):I have never had Riesling with any age on it before, and this is not at all what I expected. It was a deep gold in color, but that's the only symptom of age that I could discern. Lots of acid, all of the hallmarks of Riesling. It was relatively...
The same producer also makes a Graves Blanc (Chateau Graville-Lacoste) that is very good and a pretty good value at $2 more a bottle or so. He also has a Sauternes property; I've never seen anything from that, but I'll buy some if I ever do.Kermit Lynch really is the man.
I'm no expert about either old wines or the multiplicity of ways wine can be spoiled, but I think that while heat damage and seepage often go hand in hand, it is possible to have the one without the other. As for corked wine, that's a TCA infection that's present from the moment the wine is bottled (or earlier, if it's the winery equipment that's contaminated with TCA instead of the corks); it won't cause the cork to fail or to appear dodgy in any way.When you say that the...
Some recent wines. As usual, all images pilfered. I think Greek wines are enjoying something of a moment now -- Houston had a restaurant with an all-Greek wine list open last year to a lot of buzz, and it seems like every respectable purveyor of wines has at least a half dozen different bottlings. Sigalas Assyrtiko is probably the one that I see most frequently. This was a strange wine for me. There's a ton of acidity, but it has the big body and mouth-coating texture...
Some of the biodynamic approach to planting, with cover crops and the livestock, make some amount of sense to me. Burying cow horns filled with manure, on the other hand, is firmly in the realm of the crazy. I don't dislike seeing certified biodynamic wineries, though, because the wines are usually good. My theory is that somebody paying a lot of attention to the grapes is a good thing, even if some of that somebody's ideas are insane.
I think it got a bad rap everywhere -- I think in a lot of appellations in southern France, it's legal in ever-decreasing proportions. They want more of the "improving" varietals like Mourvedre. It always sort of struck me like the "whitening" policy in Brazil in the early 20th Century.Carignan has always been an important constituent of most of the Ridge field blends like Geyserville and Lytton Springs, and I've been seeing more of it recently. My favorite, I think, has...
A few recent wines. All images pilfered. Domaine de la Voƻte des Crozes is in Kermit Lynch's stable of Beaujolais. I saw the 2005 on the shelf last year and was told that it was a library release as opposed to stock that had been unsold for 9 years. It was fine, with a bit of that musty forest floor thing that I associate with Burgundy. The problem is that all of the exuberant fruit that I like with Beaujolais was gone. Interesting as an experiment, but maybe I should...
I think Marcel Deiss is catnip to a lot of sommeliers, both because he makes good wine and because he's not so well known. I have only ever had his Alsace Blanc, which is a mixture of the 13 grape varieties legal in Alsace. I didn't especially like it because Muscat and Gewurtraminer tend to ruin everything they touch for me, but I would certainly give his Rieslings a try if I saw them at a reasonable price.
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