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Posts by Despos

The percentages of ordering cloth successfully later for a vest are not in your favor and for many reasons. The shading from another piece can be off significantly enough it may appear it isn't the same cloth. The shading of color rarely, almost never, will match from different pieces. There can be slight variation from the beginning of a bolt to the end of the same piece. You risk the cloth being completely sold out. Have had this happen within a week of ordering...
Regardless of how you adjust the jacket from the waist down to the hem the jacket is skimpy from the chest up thru the shoulders and throws the proportions off. In other words, whatever you do on the bottom will not offset the narrow chest and shoulder and create the look you want to have. If you buy jackets with the correct fit/proportion in the shoulder and chest, reducing the lower part of the jacket will get you there. The middle jacket looks larger in the hip area...
These are the wrong silhouettes for your figure and the aesthetic you are going for. First and second jackets are too small in the chest and the result is you get this pear silhouette. The difference between the tweed jacket and the dark suit is the shoulder width. The tweed has an A line from shoulder to hip and the bottom jacket has V shape due to the shoulder. Notice the V shape between the lapels is bowing like ( ) on the tweed and second jacket and a bit more (not...
This is tailoring 101. Human form has angles and curves and shapes that are 3 dimensional. The cut of the jacket needs to correspond to the body. When the clothing is cut to match the shape of the wearer you get a smooth fit like the later examples. When the cut of the jacket or trouser does not match your body type, you get the first three pictures. Read thru some of the posts by atailor in the Tailors Tutorials, you'll get an idea of what is going on
My guess is you are measuring the lapels differently than the tailor. Do you measure along the gorge line, the seam where the collar is sewn to the lapel, from the lapel roll to the tip of the lapel? Proper method is to measure perpendicular from the break line/roll of the lapel to the tip of the lapel. You will get about 1/2" difference between the two methods of measuring. This lapel width is more flattering to my eye than if it were more narrow
It is really best to do all the shaping before sewing the leg together. The areas that require shrinking the cloth can be done with an iron post construction but the areas that are stretched are best done and more effective if done pre construction. You don't want to stretch a sewn seam and break the thread. I think this has been discussed and the iron work photographed by jefferyd, check the tailors tutorial thread
I strongly disliked/hated the shot from the beans aged in the barrels. Barista wanted me to try it and comped me a shot. Would not order it as espresso.
That's cute. Knew a New York tailor who could create so much shape in the leg with a hand iron and then he would leave the trousers locked down in a pressing machine overnight to set the shape. It was really beautiful, amazing work. You won't see that level of work around anymore.
Yes, shaping is done with an iron. On the back part the thigh/crotch area is shrunk in along the crease and the calf below the knee is stretched along the side seam creating an inward shaped curve at the thigh and an outward directed curve over the calf. The front is stretched slightly over the thigh along the crease and the front crease is shrunk in from knee to hem and the sides of the front below the knee are stretched. The front is stretched where the back is shrunk on...
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