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Posts by rach2jlc

+1. Or, again, learn a language simply for the underlying cognitive benefits, not necessarily with the intention of doing much with it or speaking with native speakers beyond what Globe mentioned. Bilingual speakers almost always do better on mathematical tests, spatial, perceptual, and analytic reasoning, etc. You don't gain these consciously, but they develop over time as your brain adapts new pathways required by the second language that were not in the first.So, in...
"Oh, papa Homer, you are so learnED.""Learn'd, son. It's pronounced 'learn'd"
This is actually very good advice, and quite true (in my experience). As well, I think it's a mistake to assume the "better" you become in a foreign language (especially a non-western one), the more you'll be able to advance. I actually found my prospects diminished by truly fluent non-western language status (it was threatening to many native speakers, in addition to being a hamper on various "expectations" they had of foreigners) Yes, it was useful in the USA for...
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^Well, the thing is that all of these brands also have responded to growing demand and global economic concerns to release "entry" level products that are embarrasing crap. Fendi, Coach, etc. all have the equivalent of "outlet" goods that are truly awful. BUT, that's why it is important always to see and feel in person, because they also have good stuff. LV's seasonal and runway men's items are very well made, and often have very minimal branding. Same with Prada....
^There's no real comparison between April in paris and Valextra. Valextra is a decent brand andI I've had a number of pieces, but bea's stuff is much better, and given that you can customize what you want with her, the choice is clear. She's also very friendly and will give you her opinions on colors and such. Also, glad you chose Jack Spade (or something non-Prada). Once my favorite "go to" brand for modern, minimal, well made stuff that few under the radar, Prada's...
I'll be interested to compare it to the Japanese scent Eroica I mentioned a few pages back. Found it for a song, it's made by Kanebo and was a surprisingly weird Japanese scent from the 1970's. Sounds something like what you're mentioning, and also has a surprising dose of funky civet... and given that most of those old Japanese scents were copied from something else at the time, I'd not be surprised if it's DNA is carried over from the Guerlain.Anyway, here's hoping...
Srsly, 100 posts about this damn shirt? Wear it, enjoy it in good health, and give it up already. Btw, have you considered just going to the RL site, finding "contact us," and asking THEM these questions?
They can be hard to find in some places, but see if you can find Orobianco or Felisi; they also make a nice, lightweight nylon bag, with good quality, made in Italy, at half or less the price of Prada. Orobianco I regularly see for $250/200 euros/20,000 yen area, and Felisi $500/400 euros/40,000 yen range.sadly, I can't recommend Prada anymore. I've had probably 20-30 bags since the mid 1990's, but recent handlings in the store show some shockingly overpriced, glued...
L'inc, did you ever try TDC Jasmin de nuit? Baron, you're enticing me to find eau du coq. I remember we talked before about what a unique chameleon note civet can be. Paired with crisper/lighter notes, it creates the "armpit stink" or "piss" vibe (Rose Poivree, Eau d'hermes, Kouros, etc). Paired with vanilla, patchouli, santal, or "darker" heavy or woody notes, and it turns into it baby shit (jicky, Miss Dior ((parfum)), old Must de Cartier, bois de santal, etc.) ...
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