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Posts by rach2jlc

Thanks for the info!With selection, it's easy to get spoiled in Japan; virtually every book/stationery store of any large size will have the range of Pilot and Sailors (so, imagine every Barnes&Noble having an entire fountain pen section!). Many will be 20% off retail, with further sales from time to time. Overall, in Japan for $100 (or 8-10,000 yen) you can get a very nice, brand new Pilot or sailor very easily.
Maybe it's just but I wonder sometimes if they don't mark some things "sold out" on purpose to give the appearance of hype/demand. Obviously, I have no idea, but I can't really see how, where, or why people buy $12k items online. Folks in the market for that go to the boutiques, where they have established relationships with the sales associates. Kids with $$$ in the rural provinces who want "ZOMG YSL" buy logo-besmirched tshirts online... but not couture or $12k...
best necropost of the month.
Must de Cartier II for me today. This one is a weird one, with a weirder history. Originally, Must de Cartier (the dark, green, smokey one) in the 1980's was just a parfum, for which the EdT was a completely different fragrance. This confused the hell out of buyers, so they changed the name to "II" in the 1990's, while releasing an EdT concentration of the original parfum as "Must." "II" was then discontinued not too terribly long thereafter. It's an equally odd...
Lots of Armani made in Turkey, eastern europe, china, etc. Quite frankly, that it said openly "made in Turkey" is more a sign of authenticity, as a fake suit generally will say "made in Italy." The goal of a fake is to get you to buy it thinking it is something else; there is a lot more sales potential in saying "italy" than "turkey."This thread has been necroposted many times since it's initial posting nearly six years ago, but for posterity lest some new member...
Like the looks of the B&E. I must admit not being familiar with the brand; shall google forthwith!
+1, or they need to bite the bullet and make a "diffusion" line. The problem is that they put "Dunhill" on all of them in the same way, even though they are clearly not the same at all. I don't mind "MiC" in priciple, except that side by side you'd see the differences in details... and yet they are priced the same.It's also fairly hard to tell... while they'll stamp "Made in England" easily, the "MiC' badge is hidden on a tab down at the bottom of the bag so you have to...
+1, my feelings exactly. It's a shame, because the styling on some was quite interesting. Anyway, this is one reason why Lanvin (in addition Ferragamo and Dior) are on my "no go" bag list... except at STEEEEEP discount.In general, with brands that are not primarily bag/luggage makers, we have to remember that (1) the creative directors generally don't handle bags, leaving them to a design team or an accessories designer, (2) the design teams often have little control...
Be sure to give it a very thorough going over; few months back checked out a number of the Spring Dunhill collection and many of the bags were made in... surprise... China.They weren't terrible quality, but the details/stitching didn't look so great, and the prices were nearly the same as the Italy/France/England etc. items.Basically looked/felt like expensive Coach. NOTE: I didn't see this particular bag, however, and not ALL the bags were MiC.
It can CHANGE, given oxidation, settling of the oils, etc. but it's not something that ages like a wine or scotch. So, no, I don't think really you could say it smells "better" if you mean an improvement upon what the parfumeur wants it to be the minute (s)he puts it in the bottle. It goes in at its peak and changes/degrades from there.My guess as to the "better" or "stronger" you describe has more to do with climate/weather in which you are wearing it than the actual...
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