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Posts by rach2jlc

I'm curious to hear other opinions, but IMHO I don't think so. Navy is pretty subtle and (unlike black) the shades between your ensemble are almost ALWAYS slightly different. Your shoes/belt (or a tie if you wear one) will create sufficient contrast. Now if you somehow find a navy belt and navy shoes... that might be a little much. We don't really want you to look like Tom Ford 1996-97 Gucci Tone-on-tone.I also think it's a lot of fun to have one SMALL piece (like a...
Probably not your fault; I made that post after a few glasses of Malbec (haha).[/quote]I agree with you, for sure. My main point was about versatility, not really formality. And IMHO black really ISN'T very versatile... despite being the "default" option of most guys. They may think it is because that's what most everybody else does... but as JR MOUSE said... once they start to explore and expand their wardrobes a bit, I think they find that black really doesn't...
Actually, in my opinion the list goes gray, navy, mocha, cognac, followed by black at the end in terms of versatility. Unless you are wearing black... a black bag often looks wonky (like black shoes with any other color outfit). Black is probably the least versatile color, despite being the most ubiquitous currently for bags.
I personally don't think it works like suits; I think instead that bag color is related more to versatility than to formality. Bag STYLE would be more or less formal, but color more or less versatility (like belts).I would see your list more in those terms, though perhaps with black, cognac, mocha, navy in that order. Gray I'd add at the end in terms of the most versatile bag color.
Nobody wearing any Halloween scents tonight? I'm thinking of something good and dark, maybe something with copious immortelle (Dior Eau Noire, Goutal Sables) would be a good H-ween scent. Caron L'anarchiste has that copper-y "blood" note many find (which I personally dont' think is there, but purely psychological). That might be a good one though.
I received a decant of Sisley Eau d'ikar last week and am giving it another spin today. I quite like the opening and middle... but it's fleeting on my skin and ends not with a bang... but a whimper. Definitely worth a sniff if you are near a sample... but I don't know that I'd rush out and get a full bottle. I have to give it a few more tries (and save a bit to try in different seasons) though, because I can tell at first sniff it's one I really WANT to like. Anybody...
Me too. I had one of the first big batches on a basenotes buy-in many moons ago (I think I ended up with 100-150 mls of it). Not really one on my "patchouli list" but still a unique and wonderful scent experience.
Haha. Don't be surprised if s(he) asks you if you've been hanging out next to a wood stove all day. Always a good choice. Did you ever give Timbuktu or the original (pre-reform) Antaeus a spritz? Another weird dry/woody/desert fragrance to try might be Lutens Miel de bois.
Good idea. Think I'll join you.
Chanel PM was my first "real" fragrance as well. I loved it and still do. The PM Concentree followed, and I like it as well (though many don't). These days I keep the original Tiffany for Men on hand (which is similar and also by the same 'nose'), but both are lovely chypres worth a wear at any time.In my old(er) age I like funkier/stinkier juice so it doesn't get the play it did back then, but it still is great for a meeting or a nostalgic "dip into the imaginary" (as...
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