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Posts by literasyme

Quote: Originally Posted by Blackhood I thought the ü was more of an "oooh" sound? No, it's not. It's virtually the same as the French u (as in Rue, for instance). Much closer to "ee" than to "oo" in English.
Quote: Originally Posted by Siggy Is it "tomaaato" or "tomaahto"? Blucher was a German general's name, so if you really wanted to pronounce it correctly you would have to use the German pronunciation "Jawohl Blucher!" (more towards "blue"...) Well, it's Blücher, isn't it -- so it should, technically, be closer to Blee-kher (since English doesn't have that diphthong; it's like the French u; the "ch" also isn't "tsh" or "ck" but a softer...
Quote: Originally Posted by academe As has often been said you either like drape or not. At some point you just don't get any more mileage from arguing about it further... +1 However, the extended shoulders are something else. We could argue -- pointlessly -- about whether we like them or not, but I would say again that an RTW jacket with shoulders like that would be criticized as being too big or ill fitting, whereas in a bespoke jacket, they...
Not to get too metaphysical, but do you really see the soul of a shoe embodied in its sole? Surely the last, or maybe the patina, is closer to the mark....
Looks like this thread is sort of back on track. Interesting discussion of that jacket. Personally, this does strike me as an instance where something that would be seen as a flaw in a RTW garment becomes a feature of a particular bespoke tailor's house style. I'm pretty sure that such a shoulder, if displayed in a WAYWT post and on a RTW garment, would be called sloppy, ill-fitting, or simply "too wide." But how can we have it both ways? If this sort of effect can be...
How come AE refused to deal with them?
Actually, no. Books may come shrink-wrapped -- though many don't -- in which case they'd be "NWT" in eBay's lexicon. But the other book descriptions essentially match up to various shadings of "Used," which eBay, AFAIK, doesn't prescribe but leaves to the seller. You do have a point that further differentiating distinct categories of usedness would be helpful. With books, it doesn't necessarily matter if a particular volume has been read -- it may still look like new....
Quote: Originally Posted by SpooPoker NEW WITH TAGS - brand new, has a tag hanging from it NEW WITHOUT TAGS - never worn the label that hangs from it is missing NEW WITH DEFECTS - NWT but shopwear/damages PREOWNED - used and worn End of story. Could be from 1900 or 10 minutes ago, does not matter at all. /discussion This. But of course linguistics, semantics, and lexicography are all tricky subjects in which the semi-knowledgeable...
No, a good tailor wouldn't touch the back seam. Sides get taken in from the back seam of the side panels (on RTW coats, the pockets normally make it impossible to take in the front seams, I believe; I don't know if patch pockets make a difference). If necessary, your tailor can remake the vents. The real question, though, is why you would want to alter the coat at all, and what the consequences would be. You say it fits well as is when buttoned -- i.e., the way it was...
And while Webster's is a fairly mediocre dictionary, and does therefore not cover this particular meaning of "new," it has some that approximate it, 2a in particular: something does not have to have "come into existence" recently (1a) in order to be "seen, used, or known for a short time" (2a). Intriguingly, this definition of "new" would actually cover lightly used items, just as long as they've not been in use for long. As I said, crappy dictionary.
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