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Posts by A Y

He's also kind of lazy, so cloth filters are a no-go. You can taste the filter by running hot water through it and tasting the filter “tea” that comes out. It's very apparent there, but I don't taste it very much in the brew itself.
A friend who just got into coffee is super-sensitive to paper taste. Even steeping in a separate container, and pouring through a rinsed, oxygen-bleached paper filter (eg. Filtropa) has too much paper taste for him. It boggles my mind, but he's using a French press because of that. The Aeropress might be good for him too because there's not much paper, and the exposure time is pretty limited.
Cole Coffee in Oakland has a good variety of beans and roasting levels: http://www.colecoffee.com/index.html It used to be part of Royal Coffee, who is a major importer of specialty coffee in the US.
BTW, Peet's has free shipping today. I just found out after ordering an extra pound of Queen City today. The mail-ordered bags are nitrogen backflushed so they will keep for much longer if you don't intend on drinking the coffee immediately.
I just brewed up in my hybrid CCD the first batch of Peet's Queen City (last roast in a while this week), which is a dry-process Harrar, and a very different experience of an Ethiopian coffee than the washed Yirgs you find at most places today. First, it's a fantastic coffee with a chocolatey aftertaste that goes on forever. Second, there's just something about the way a dark roast foams up when the water hits the grounds that says "This is coffee" like nothing else. By...
I am not qualified to be a coffee consultant, but I'm happy to be a test customer. I've been brewing more with the Aeropress at home, and really enjoying it. I'm going to try this filter once my paper ones run out: http://www.amazon.com/Filter-AeroPress-Ultra-Stainless-Coffee/dp/B00A1GVVMY/ Having more Clover coffee recently has made me want to go back to the Aeropress and try out finer metal filters than the Able ones.
Apparently, I didn't get the mokka story right either, as it sounds like the Maui mokka is its own thing. More info here written by the guy who's one of the major influences on coffee in Hawaii: he helped develop Ka'u coffee into what it is today, and is also the roaster/consultant for Rusty's, among other places: http://blog.coffeereview.com/green-coffee-origins-and-issues/demystifying-mokka/ They're really cute little round beans, smaller than almost anything else I've...
The hipsters have jumped the shark when Starbucks actually has more interesting coffee than they do. Maui is the only place other than Yemen that grows the mokka varietal at anything approaching commercial scale. Rusty's Hawaiian tends to have it year round in peaberry form, but it's sold out right now. They sell a very high quality, but very $$$ version.
They're known as the “lobster claw” wheels, FWIW.
http://sprudge.com/thermos-overnight-coffee-challenge.htmlI am glad skilled baristas will be packaging the Thermos bottles.
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