or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:

Posts by greyinla

..
..
A generally good indicator of quality is a 100% wool interlining and a hand-sewn slip stitch; these will help the tie keep its shape. The Permanent Style blog and Hober both have good posts on tie construction so you can visualize this. You can find good quality ties at discount at the Rack (2nd the rec for Faconnable and Talbott) and Last Call; ehaberdasher is also great.
..
Stylewise, they're both fine w/ navy, but for a typical office environment the dark brown (or, in some places, black) w/ a suit and tie would be the more conservative choice.
A good quality full-grain leather shoe might not be as "shiny" as a corrected-grain one. But yes, a good polishing on even a new shoe can help bring out the shine. Many threads--and opinions--on this, but never hurts to start w/ just a bit of shoe conditioner/cleaner; let dry, and buff out. Like the look of those monkstraps.
These can't be compared directly, as various shoes in each line are made by different makers, I believe mostly Barker and Loake in the Classic, Cheaney and Trickers in the Premier; you can generally figure out the maker if you are familiar w/ their lines and lasts, or you can ask Herring. In general though, I wouldn't expect the leather on any sturdy goodyear-welted shoe to soften that much. Find a last that works for you (there's lots of threads here on popular ones), and...
^Sorry, this. But you are ahead of the game in that, aside from the sleeves, you now have a good sense of a cut, measurements, and brand that work for you. That's a good place to start.
It could partially be that you're now going for goodyear welted soles, which can make a shoe feel "harder" than one w/ blake stitched soles. SF tends to favor the former, but the latter has its uses.
Sounds good. Like any big city, it depends on where you go, but in general you can get away w/ lighter materials and colors. Linen, cotton, loafers, unlined jackets, etc., work pretty much all year.
New Posts  All Forums: