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Posts by horton

I personally think you can learn some aspects of taste, and that some people pick this up faster than others. i also believe some people are gifted in this area -- the real vanguards
I've relied on good local salespeople to help select age appropriate looks that I like. Much to my surprise I've been able to find pieces from APC, Nom de Guerre, SSV that look great (for weekends, not work). Prior to their help, I would have thought that those brands were purely limited to a much younger clientele (there are some obvious pieces where they are). Bottom line: much like dress clothing it makes sense to find some someone good to help you discover...
It's amazing to me that so much Napoli styling is slim fit; yet they make (and I presume actually eat) fried pizza!
two more cents: Rizzo may be more appropriate for a business suit, than for a casual suit or a sports jacket
Isaia seems way too short IMO. The first one has very open quarters (a nod to Naples) but doesn't seem right -- too flared???
I have a few pieces from Rizzo. Joe is a nice guy and a dying breed. I like going to him in part knowing that there aren't many alternatives after him (There's an English guy on Federal street that I walk by everyday but have already forgotten the name of the place. I spoke to him briefly. He might be worth putting on radar too.) Joe's suit is very different than an Isaia. His style is more Milanese (thing Zegna or Barbera). You can get a full custom suit for that...
sous-vide. yes I think that's the name for it. It really is a great way to cook duck breast. In fact, I can't think of another meat better suited for the technique. You can do this at home with some of the vacuum packet gadgets. And yes re crisp skin. Usually just cook the meat and skin perfectly and carve away with knife and fork whatever excess you don't like. You absolutely do want some duck fat remaining. Also one thing to consider if you do render the fat...
I agree with Matt that the best way is to cook breast separate from everything else, and there are a lot of ways to do that. Jasper White has a lacquered (sp?) duck recipe that is good. re duck breasts, it often helps to pour out some of the rendered fat as it starts to build up in the pan. If you're really adverse to duck fat, then I don't think there's any way to saute to get rid of it all without overcooking the breast. That is, the primary concern should be how...
If you have a clear idea of what you want I can't imagine why you would need an architect or a contractor. I'd recommend an interior designer. At least in my experience they add a lot of value. For example, they'll help you decide whether a full wall really makes sense for your space (your room will feel like a library afterwards) or whether half walls and other nooks and crannies might be a better fit. There are various finish carpenters who usually aren't tough...
agree with the above poster but will add that the short and fat ones can be a bitch to pour from. I use the short fat ones for bigger wines that need more air to breath and less fat at other times because they're easier to use. again I agree with above poster in that there's no need to splurge on a decanter. better to spend the $$ on glasses or better still the wine itself
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