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Posts by williamson

Please, EVERYONE, don't recommend wearing no tie with a suit. How many times do you have to be told that such a look is sloppy and unfinished?
Quite possibly, but many, including myself, wish they wouldn't!True, no doubt - but what a pity!
And everyone needs to learn that such crudities of expression are totally unnecessary. Civilised dialogue is not helped by them - they are nasty and unwelcome in both writing and speech, and SF would be a far pleasanter place if writers refrained from using them.
Why does anyone WANT to look "laid back"?
Indeed it is; but the correct noun is "attender".Perhaps my last sentence was misleading; but compare employer/employee and you should see what I mean.
It is also partly because there are reds and reds - some that go with the grey/blue/black "city" or "business" wardrobe - what I think of as "black shoe clothes" (the blue-reds) and some that go with the green/brown/earth "country" wardrobe - what I see as "brown shoe clothes" (the brown-reds and orange-reds). But it's all too easy to wear the "wrong" red.
I think you are being iconoclastic for the sake of it, though there is some sense in what you say.The correct word, if there is one, is "attender". The suffix "-ee" is a passive one, the suffix "-er" the active one. Compare employer-employee. As "attend" is an intransitive verb, it cannot have a passive.
Exactly!
I'm sorry, but I don't think this does work - Barbour jacket and city suit are an incongruous pair (even though they have been worn by Ministers of Agriculture). Don't mix modes and messages. Wear a full-length overcoat or raincoat over a suit - you won't then get your trousers wet in rain. Fortunately, we've moved on from the eighties/yuppy era.With respect to shoes, I have to say that they interest me very little - from another posting by you, you seem to be very fussy...
I don't know from where you are writing, but (as I believe I have explained on a thread concerned with raincoats on this forum) tan means different things in British and American English. A "tan" raincoat in America would likely be called beige, fawn or stone here.This is the shade that is called "tan" on this side of the Atlantic.
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