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Posts by williamson

Absolutely right on both counts!Hats are easiest when worn for practical reasons, as here (or with an overcoat or raincoat in cold or wet weather). This wise advice was given to me by Holdfast himself.
To the author of post 73003 Why do you use such foul language? There's no need of it, and I think it offensive and repugnant.
I'm afraid I have an almost instinctive dislike of the “wide-boy” style - perhaps the term "flash" (as an adjective) is the clue here. Undoubtedly something of this style was present in the late 1980s - I well remember the double-breasted jackets, with only one fastening button low down, which to me were so ugly (and often worn unbuttoned into the bargain). Of the 1930s I can say nothing, but I remember this style as being around in the UK during the late 1940s austerity...
As a (now required) teacher, I couldn't disagree more with your point on "approachability". "Approachability" is in the manner of the person wearing the clothes, not in the clothes themselves. One could be "approachable" dressed formally. I wore a jacket and tie (I won't wear a jacket without a tie) to the end of my teaching days in an upper secondary school, and was never considered "unapproachable".I am sure this is true - and as true on this side of the Atlantic as...
Hear, hear!
More's the pity!
Great!
Appropriate over a suit? The jacket is far too short. Your trousers will get twice as wet from rain run-off. Choose a raincoat at least knee-length for wear over a suit.
The word "tan" has different meanings in British and American English. In Britain we refer to beige trench-coats and other raincoats; that colour is called "tan" in the USA. "Tan" in British English is a much darker colour - a lightish yellowish brown, often the colour of shoes.
The Northern Lights are often green, and (I suspect) rarely if ever brown!
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