or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:

Posts by DWFII

Well, I don't think an arch cookie, all by itself, is near as problematic as a full length insert. Or even one that runs from the back of the heel to under the ball of the foot.You have to understand that manufacturers design lasts and make shoes to fit the widest range of feet they can with the smallest number of sizes.Lasts, in the US come in many sizes from AAA-EEE, and even widths out of that range by special order. Most manufactures seldom carry more than one or two...
Munky,Re-reading my post, I suspect my remark could be misunderstood or seen as cryptic.So...a slight correction/clarification:I'm not talking simply about decreasing interior volume. That does happen, as well--occasionally, rarely, for the better, but most often to the detriment of the foot.The real issue is that adding any kind of insert/insole into a shoe changes the insole shape; changes the relationship of the foot to the insole, and, as a result, changes the fit.This...
Because they change the shape...and fit...of the shoe?
Depends on the kind of insert. Some people need corrective or orthopedic inserts but these have to be prescribed by a doctor in most states/countries.If you're talking about simple over-the-counter cushioned inserts, well, some people think they can't wear shoes without them. And if we harken back to what pB said about running shoes and the like, it may be true esp. if the person isn't willing to toughen up (we say "cowboy up" out here) their feet.But aside from...
Unless some sort of production line is being set up, with makers specializing exclusively in one part of the operation, that shouldn't make a difference. Sure, more shoes can be turned out in a week with more workers, but the number of hours per pair is not going to change unless work processes are changed.Frankly, I have a hard time envisioning why it would take 120 hours. 80-90 if one is really, really careful...or very inexperienced....but the other 40 hours or so...
Ah! But there are solvents in All Purpose cements. When cements and oils mix, the cement always looses--they're natural antagonists. You can't, for instance, use a solvent based adhesive to cement together two pieces of leather if one of them is stuffed.That said, putting Lexol-brown on your linings and insoles occasionally probably won't affect the construction, but the cement used on gemming is AP. One of the things we value leather for is its permeability. Too much...
Well, Lexol does make a neatsfoot oil product--Lexol-nf. I suppose if the shoes were soaked in it (and I've seen people do that) it could affect the adhesive. But as strong as that adhesive is, eventually it breaks down under the use and ultraviolet rays etc.. That's why...no matter what adhesive is used ...sewing the outsole on is always to be preferred over cement sole construction.I apologize if I came across as offering orthopedic advice--I am not qualified to give...
No one can serve two masters--you have to choose: to make shoes or to make money. You can't do both.
From what I know (not all that much in this regard), hammer toes and clawed toes while not necessarily symptomatic are surely a possible symptom. I guess I never thought of the type of formation in the photo as being "clawed." "Clawed" speaks to me as being like a claw--curved downward, maybe more like hammer toes.That said, I am not a doctor, I do not have the condition myself and, in accordance with Oregon law, I don't do orthopedic work., so I readily defer to your...
New Posts  All Forums: