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Posts by DWFII

Ahem...your avatar functions as a super-smilie. He doesn't look amused.
Yeah...it's gotten a bit out of hand. Sorry about that. I keep telling myself "this will be my last post about this"....As for how it got started...probably because according to Wikipedia the oxford seems to have originated in Scotland and/or Ireland. And then when I responded to JubaiSpiegal about "sartorial rules," I had the Scottish connection in my head and went off on a tangent about my own druthers with regard to formal or non-formal. And from there...well, I'm not...
May I ask where you live? Are you Scots? Sounds like you wear a kilt on occasion.The kilt I'm wearing is a MacSween, Black, designed for me as a variation of the MacQueen and registered with the STA (7903). The castellated hose was made for me by my wife and contains the red and black of the MacQueen tartan with yellow rakers.Interestingly enough (for some, perhaps), some time after the Black MacSween was designed and registered as a personal sett, I got an email from one...
I won't pursue this, but just a few remarks in passing...Again, I'm no expert I don't even live in the UK (sounds like you may) . For me it is all part of my family history and an occasional divertissement (although with a very serious undertone).That said, tartan hose was worn at very formal occasions--white tie--well into the 1920's and beyondAnd while the trend has been to white hose (looks like underwear, IMO) or solid coloured hose to downplay the authenticity of...
Probably a Montrose Doublet or at least a Prince Charlie with a jabot.. But I have seen photos of balls at which the Royal family was purportedly in attendance where buckle shoes and tartan hose were being worn among many of the participants.That said, while I am no expert I know quite a lot about the history of the kilt and Highland wear and about the MacSuibhne clan/family. And I've looked at hundreds and hundreds of old photos and paintings. I also know that by the time...
Yes, I see that. It does make sense....as far as it goes. But so what?! Everything we see, know, think, and believe falls into that category. We are not Gods. In all likelihood everything we think we know is wrong.Certainly...as Oscar Wilde said..."Everything popular is wrong."If we are responsible, mindful human beings we strive towards culling out that which we know is wrong (and / or cannot be proven) and we further strive to not perpetuate those falsehoods.That's all...
I'm going to be brief here...(or try)...people tend to throw around terms like "evidence" with little or no justification. Personal experience is not evidence. Conjecture is not evidence. Likes are not evidence.Opinion is not evidence unless it is based on objective demonstrable fact.What people believe is not evidence nor even some sort of self-fullfilling justification for their own beliefs. Many people today believe that Vikings wore helms with horns on them. Nothing...
Och, ye niver should ha' said that, laddie.(click to enlarge)Tartan hose is as old as kilts and the highlands.They were once made of shaped pieces of the same wool that kilts were made of--not necessarily, almost never, matching.. Here's one of a whole series of clan paintings from the Victorian era by a fellow named Macleay. This is Kenneth MacSween...an ancestor?And another of King (Prince?) Edward VIII:Actually the footwear is of a style that was popular in the late...
I have a tendency to agree wholeheartedly.I am not a very "stylish" person. I own a slightly oversized tweed sportscoat and an immaculately pressed Eisenhower jacket. One pair of dress pants.Come Bobbie Burns b'day I can sometimes be seen putting on the Ritz in Scots fashion--walking out like a solid man in a best quality 16 oz. wool Black MacSuibhne Kilt, Ettrick Tweed Argyl jacket w/ waistcoat, tartan hose, etc.. (I'd wear a black wholecut in a heartbeat if I didn't...
Preliminary returns from my friend at CWF, say medieval times for whole cut uppers with an instep slit / facings for laces or ties (remember no heels as we know them before late16th century); and early 19th century for something very close to what we call a whole cut oxford.Still working.edited for punctuation and clarity
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