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Posts by DWFII

I took lessons from a well respected professional...who steered me towards a special mouthpiece and refining my reeds. But I never got as far as playing professionally or even semi professionally. Mostly just with my wife (flute) for kicks. I had/have an ebony Leblanc Noblet (pretty early). I liked to play swing era jazz.I haven't touched mine in years either although I tried to pick up the pennywhistle again early this year...until my wife started reminding me to write...
I expect you're right although I would say...FWIW...that when breaking glass, straight edges are neither wanted nor very likely to occur.PS...and on edit...I used to shape and refine the reeds for my clarinet with purposed-created sections of dried horsetail. Bamboo can be quite hard and horsetail quite abrasive, this I know.--
Interesting. I can see how that would be possible.That said, and by way of indicating that mine was not a throw-away remark...I turned wood for some years and became fascinated by wood and woodworking, although never to the point of real expertise much less "mastery."But I was particularly drawn to a documentary done by Public Broadcasting which interviewed a woodworker from the Smithsonian or Colonial Williamsburg or somewhere like that.These institutions need to know...
Side liners are pieces of leather that are sandwiched between the liner and the vamp running from the end of the heel stiffener to the beginning of the toe stiffener. They run along the sides of the shoe and get incorporated into the inseam to help maintain structure and to minimize creasing and cracking. Think of them as extensions of the heel stiffener. You can see those pieces in the deconstructed HW shoe in the link above. Sixth photo from the bottom right hand side...
I may be in the minority here but I don't care for textile reinforcement. Along the topline, yes, but I suspect using fabric originated, and is still used today, to compensate for cutting marginal leather. Certainly if you cut a vamp close to the backbone, and if it is aligned correctly relative to the lines of stretch, fabric reinforcement is pretty much beside the point. But in such cases...almost entirely restricted to bespoke makers...you don't get but one or maybe at...
Thank you for that.So...not daunted but willing to learn, despite my "feelings" about barley mash, tell me what chemical in barley mash would be capable of doing this. AFAIK, barley mash consists primarily of starch and some residual maltose and a lot of dead (suicidal) yeast...and perhaps a small amount of alcohol.Will Everclear create cross links?
I'm not a leather chemist either so I could very easily be wrong (said at the beginning that I was "speculating") but it is, AFAIK, the tannic acid that causes that cross linking. Even in a leather such as chamois, which is "tanned" (or perhaps more properly "tawed") with fish oil, it is the fatty acids which do the critical work. Hopefully, @patrickBOOTH can clarify this for us. And FWTW, I haven't tried, but I'm pretty sure you have to boil acorns before they are...
Brain tanning is dependent on the smoke to create an environment inimical to the growth of bacteria. Veg tanning depends on the tannic acid derived from certain barks of plants. Urine depends on uric acid. Etc.. All inhibit the dissolution / breakdown of the flesh."I'm a shoemaker Jim, not a chemist"--all I'm saying is that there are a lot of these "stories" that float around esp. on the Internet but most of them are apocryphal. Urban legend. BS."Photographs or it never...
When a shoe is made...using Traditional techniques at least...the grain side of the insole is, as Nicholas suggested, scraped. Many use a bit of broken glass for such work (there is even a whole mystique that has grown up around how to break glass) although at one time Barnsley offered a range of metal scrapers that functioned in the same way as the glass. See post #1517, middle illustration. Others will use sandpaper. I can't honestly say it makes much of a...
I'm mostly speculating but I cannot, for the life of me, imagine how the barley mash would preserve the hides. Today it is often fed to animals...which suggests it is subject to breakdown by the same sorts of bacteria that would process and break down any organic material. Including animal skins.
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