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Posts by DWFII

Just speculating, but another way to do what Bestetti is doing, is, as @ntempleman suggested, simply to make that bridging leather a separate piece. Punch the eyes and trim as usual, then add the bridging piece and sew with white (or contrasting) thread using a round point needle (so as not to cut existing threads) right into the same holes as the closing stitches. Last and bottom the shoes. When the shoe is done, the white threads would be carefully picked and the...
Oh!! Chrome tanned lining (and soft)--I don't know how you trim that really, really clean even if the maker is very precise.
Must be morning fog, but I don't see a problem. Admittedly I have never done it this way but eyes could be punched before the shoe is lasted. And as for trimming, I'd simply punch a very small hole through the lining, near the bottom and between the facings, and trim the lining a half centimeter or so (more or less) up from that hole. Again before lasting. Then it's just a straight shot from the top of the facings to this previously trimmed area. Of course, I use a very...
I'm pretty sure he doesn't wear those with his kilt.
I have done it both ways as well and for reasons that go way back and deep in my Traditions I am leaning more and more towards making the last exactly the same as the foot and lasting with the facings where I want them to be when worn. I don't know how others do it but I had to more or less "invent" ((probably invented many times before) a technique to lace them with the facings straight and yet a cm apart at the top (oxfords).But I make some ankle high shoes...like...
I could be mistaken but I seem to recall seeing a pair of Bestetti's in process where the lining itself bridged the gap between the facings--no laces, no whipping needed. Not sure how it is accomlished in detail but it seemed like a good solution. Sometimes I'll throw a thin piece of lining in between the faces and the tongue. And I generally use a short discarded piece of waxed end in lieu of laces, so there's less stretch. As a maker, the bigger question...esp. on...
Being a maker myself there's two aspects of that--first, I don't wear anyone's shoes but my own.And second, as a maker I look at the details, the refinement, the stitching, the outsole treatment,etc.-- all the things that a maker looks at and...with all due respect...few if any consumers are as capable of appreciating.
From what I've seen in photos, I'd say that there are a handful of Japanese makers that are exceptional...maybe better than all but a handful of European makers. But those that are exceptional were trained by...usually exceptional...British or French makers. And that's the whole point of taking an apprentice or training someone--the student should be able to surpass the master. Not all do...maybe most won't...but the potential is there. If only because of the head start...
No. And if I remember correctly Lexol has a relatively large amount of water in it. FWIW, even high grade French calf can have a heavy finish.
Generally speaking, if Lexol in the brown bottle leaves a residue it is because the leather has a heavy finish on it...maybe even "corrected grain"...it's not being absorbed into the leather.That said Bick4 is the better product IMO, but some like one, some like the other.
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