or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:

Posts by DWFII

FTFY
Aye, but bear in mind that the older, bombe' alligator and crocodile was a different tannage than calf or modern gator. It was much, much drier. And it was "glazed" with a burnishing technique that had to generate a certain amount of heat. So, overall, those leathers were more fragile than calf or contemporary gator.
I think I read somewhere...years ago...that the area between the tiles was called the "interstice." It is, depending on the age and size of the animal, good leather. To call it a "membrane" suggests that it is thin and fragile. It is thin(ner) than the tiles, and softer, but not particularly fragile. Except...except for the fact that because the tiles tend to be far firmer, even stiff, relative to the interstices, it is virtually always in the interstices that alligator...
Crocodile is considered the premium leather of this type, with alligator close behind. Caiman is the least desirable as it usually exhibits boney inclusions on almost every tile. Croc costs more than gator at least in the US. See this page (one of my suppliers)The belly is generally considered the prime area on crocodillians. So...where a shoe is cut depends more on the size/age of the animal than anything else. If the animal is old/large the tiles will be large. If the...
Yes, leathers do have an effect...the literature suggests that when using thicker leathers the last ought to be fit slightly looser. To understand why, you have to visualize the difference in the way a thicker leather will crease as opposed to a thinner. Heavier creases will put more pressure on the foot.Seams can make a difference but probably only minimally unless such seams are located over critical joints or bones. And I pay particular attention to the way lining seams...
That's a plausible conclusion. At a certain point, however, if you're having this much problem you may need to look at bespoke or MTM.Again, RTW seeks to fit the most people with the least amount of effort or variation.Again, consider that in the American system of last grading we have a minimum of five possible widths in each length size. And possibly even nine or more possible widths.Most RTW brands...even the highest of the high end...offer only three possible widths,...
Depends. Feet can be complicated beyond the power of anyone to simplify or rationalize. You could, for instance, have a foot that is wide..."E" for instance...in the forepart, and narrow in the heel--say an A. You would naturally buy shoes to fit the forepart but the heel would not be well served. You could buy a shoe that was a D under those circumstances (one size narrower than your true width) and still end up with a D heel--threes sizes too wide for your heel.Beyond...
wengxiah, In response...width problem equals heel problem (or greatly contributes to it). With the possible exception of the insole (plantar surface), the shape of a last that the customer sees and buys usually has little to no relationship to fit. The shape of a last that the bespoke maker arrives at to fit the foot usually has little or no relationship to appearance. For instance, a good bespoke maker can fit the same foot...the same measurements...with a last that...
One final comment...directed at no one specifically, and apropos of nothing other than thoughts that were generated in the course of the past dozen or so posts... There is virtually nothing that anyone can say about any subject on this forum that someone will not take exception to or be offended by. And nine times out of ten those most offended will be those with the least justification--those not involved in the discussion and/or esp. those with the least amount of...
As far as what the average person should look for in a RTW shoe...well, it takes some effort and study, I will admit. A person has to know their feet --the relative proportions, at least. A person has to understand how feet correlate to, and function in, a shoe. And it can never be predicated on or subordinate to style or what's available. Never. Period. Not if you're really interested in fitting your foot properly. Sabbage is a good start for understanding the...
New Posts  All Forums: