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Posts by DWFII

I understood--wry humour.
Everything comes down to technique and materials. I've been saying this forever.1) As you can see, D results in a mess if not done correctly. Or if the leather of the insole is poor or unsuitable. But the same could be said for any of them, although IMO, B and D are especially vulnerable simply because the technique leaves the thread vulnerable. And because, thinner insole leather is often employed.2) Again the same general observations apply...good leather, skilled and...
IMO...B-R is far superior to GY.As far as "vaunted" is concerned there isn't much "vaunting" from folks who know and appreciate the differences.
There is an inside channel cut into the insole on this shoe...at least as far as I can tell (photos can be deceiving and there's no way to view this one at a larger size). So it's not stitched aloft.edited for punctuation and clarity
FYI & FWIW...
Probably not. Even my own teacher didn't give it much thought, as I recall. But I made it a point to teach myself...esp. after I tightened down several accidental knots in rosin and pitch waxed linen thread.I don't want to talk about it. edited for punctuation and clarity
Aye there's the rub, laddie. Fundamentally, you feed the bristles from opposite directions. Pick up the bristles and pull them enough to wrap a bit of thread around your fingers and then grasp the thread in another spot and pull to tighten...hard.You never put down your awl.And except when feeding the bristles, you never let go of them or the thread. The bristles remain in each hand throughout the tightening, hammering and holing. .I can easily feed a bristle with the awl...
Yes, he is cutting a bevel on the feather edge of the insole. I, myself, don't think that is as effective, or as protective, as cutting a rebate. But...horses for courses, different strokes...etc..At 0.13 of the video, he is cutting an inside channel.No, I would not call this "stitching aloft" or "sewing aloft" simply because the stitches will be under the edge of the inside channel and effectively covered and protected from wear, grit, etc..In the EB thread I see the...
Just a comment on a YouTube video that I recently saw--in it the maker, who is hand welting a pair of shoes, not only drops his inseaming thread between stitches but he wiggles the awl from the moment the stitch is begun to the moment the welt is pierced. I was taught that "best practices" demand that the thread not be dropped--for two reasons: first, it tends to pick up dirt and so forth, esp. if the wax is any good. And second, because it can develop a knot quite...
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