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Posts by DWFII

In the toe area ...the whole forepart actually...the stiffened area is protected by the welt--it functions like the bumper on a car.On a tightly trimmed waist (and no one admires that look...done properly...more than I do) where the insole is wider than the outsole, there is no protection, no "bumper" and a misstep can sandwich the relatively soft leather of the upper between the edge of the insole and the rock (or whatever you're stepping on ...almost always protrusive,...
No...you have to look at the texture of the leather not just the markings...which can be a dye job" and not a natural colouration.IMO (and I could be wrong--nothing definitive can be inferred from a photo), this is some kind of reptile...maybe sea turtle. Or a print.--
I don't know what you're calling a "wrinkle" but a stretch mark is created by the animal's movement--the skin constantly being stretched in one direction then the other. That's why they are almost always found in the neck and shoulder.A "wrinkle" ...in my mind/lexicon is cause by the consumer. The marking on the shoe in question were on the heel and over the heel stiffener so the likelihood of them being from consumer use are probably slim to none.Additionally, when a hide...
What I've said all along.I like the UV solution--it may be the only one that I would put any trust in.
I wasn't arguing either way but with the fat wrinkles being in the heel area ...and thus reinforced by the stiffener and the dextrine that is used to bond the quarters to the stiffener...the leather is not going anywhere. It is stable and not going to stretch, sag, or rip... etc..Again, the fat wrinkles invariably come from an area that is less dense...less "prime... than really high end or bespoke makers would willingly or knowingly cut from. But the argument can be made...
I don't think they're going to fall apart anytime soon but depending on what you paid for them....I repeat--not best quality.
You're right...it is a physical crease but it is a physical crease in the hide itself--better known as a "fat wrinkle" and almost always found in marginal areas of the hide such as the shoulder and neck. Those are areas where the animal bends the most and the leather is less dense and.Most high end makers would avoid cutting in such areas. It's not indicative of best quality or best practices.
It may be the best thing out there for cleaning shoes or any kind of top grain leather, really. Better than saddle soap by a long shot.
Frankly I don't know. I haven't had the time to read that document. I have recipes distilled from such historical documents but this was always an experiment for me...not a pursuit, if you see what I mean.That said, I don't think the "scraping" that Master Saguto is referring to is the same. That 'scraping"..."whitening" really...comes at the end of the stuffing process, and just before the hide is smutted and put up to "age."That's often the problem with historical...
Well, my mention of scraping with broken glass was as a way to shorten long and coarse fibers. Broken glass on leather works the same way that a properly sharpened steel scraper works on wood--it will shave a very thin layer off the surface.Master Saguto's mention...involving a whitening knife is a different process although it may involve similar techniques--it' purpose is to remove the residual oils and fats from the flesh side of the hide. Part of that is simply...
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