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Posts by bengal-stripe

In your previous post you stated celastics are commonly used in bespoke work. (Maybe in your neck of the woods, the picture posted by 'barky' clearly shows a cowboy boot).But now you turn it into your favourite topic again, bashing RTW footwear. Leatherboard insoles and paper heel stacks are components that can be used, but where is your evidence they actually are?This we can agree on!
Of course, celastics are not skived, but you can adjust the stiffness (due to control of the acetone) within a celastic toe-puff: rigid at the tip and quite floppy at the end. The skiving not only reduces thickness, but also adjust the stiffness within the piece. I haven't got a toe puff on hand, but in a hand-skived counter, the thickness varies from about 2.5 mm to virtually nothing at the edges. The thickness of the celastic is the same all over: it is the thickness of...
I do not think a "heat form plastic toe box and heel counters" have ever existed..The most commonly used stiffener in GW work is the 'celastic' type:There used to be a "hot puff" method using (stiff) tar-impregnated material, which subsequently got softened in a heated press, but I believe this isn't used any more as the celastic is far more flexible. Certainly preferable to a "one -size-fits-all" and crudely skived leather toe puff. Firms like EG and JL use the celastic...
You can't remove them, just as you cannot add them to a finished shoe.The use of medallions or brogue holes is a creative decision by the designer/maker. They are holes punched into the leather (at a very early stage of production) and there is no way to remove them once they are punched.If you don't like that form of decoration (fair enough), you must find a shoe design, that doesn't feature them.
Don't ask me! There are quite a few howlers in the English edition (maybe even in all editions):Page 100: (on shell cordovan).....only two small ovals or circles or circles of leather measuring aprox. 30 square feet (3 sq meters) from the rear.....(Obviously, those shells came from the Trojan horse!!!)Page 101: (on lizard skin).....when stretched out, a lizard leather measures about 10 square feet (1 sq meter). That means that at least three or four lizard skins are needed...
That might well be a mistranslation, as the Vass book was originally published in Germany.In German-language shoemaking the word "stitch" (stich) means a Paris Point, which is 6.67 mm. In German/Austrian/Hungarian work, 1/2 "stitch" (1/2 PP = 3.3 mm, or 7 1/2spi) for out-soling is considered good quality work., Coming to the inside of the square waist, the usual practice is to increase the stitch length to about 5 mm = 5spi). I have never seen finer work in...
I met-up yesterday with Shoji and Yuriko Kawaguchi, the husband and wife team who have started their own bespoke shoemaking firm Marquess in 2011. Although I had never seen any of their shoes in real life, I really admired the shoes I had come-across on the web and I’ve known of Shoji’s stellar reputation as one of the finest ‘makers’, having worked for a number of West-End bespoke firms. Marquess has caused a bit of a buzz at this forum and elsewhere, and quite rightly...
"You can have a pair made yourself, for about ten guineas!" (One guinea was a pound and a shilling. So ten guineas are £10.50 in modern money.) The inflation calculator will tell us that £10 s10 in 1945 is the equivalent of just under 400 GBP (or 675 USD) today.http://www.thisismoney.co.uk/money/bills/article-1633409/Historic-inflation-calculator-value-money-changed-1900.htmlThings do have changed!
That's a neat, little way to put the blame for things going wrong onto the customer.Any maker (of whatever product) will make mistakes and has things not coming out the way they are supposed to come out. Sometimes the fault can be corrected easily, sometimes not and the faulty product ought to be binned and a new item started afresh and from scratch. The later into the production cycle the fault appears, the higher the cost of a full remake.The maker will be the first to...
That might be again the difference between American and English terms:Here in the UK, a "belly-cut" is cut for maximum belly yield with the actual cut going through the back, left and right of the hornback strip, which might be used for a belt. Alternatively, a "hornback-cut" has the actual cut going through the belly to leave the back intact.http://www.kezieleather.com/#/crocodile-leather/4567499123
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