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Posts by bengal-stripe

Silly me, and I thought that thread was about ready-to-wear shoes (which come on RTW lasts), why do you talk about bespoke lasts?
That is probably true.But every shoe factory can run a tape measure over their existing lasts and can tell me whether or not they have any stock lasts that come close to a length of 294 mm (11 9/16") and a girth of 238 mm (9 3/8"). I know Edward Green 202 in 9 C or 32 in 9 1/2 C will be very close (although, of course, not absolutely identical).Vass will have nothing at all even remotely close. If I were to ask Vass for a last that measures 85 mm (3 5/16") from...
I have a last (to have and to hold). A last that fits as about 10 pairs of shoes do prove. And on top of it, a last that is aesthetically pleasing.But the right last, whether it's bespoke or ready-to-wear, is far more important for the satisfaction a pair of shoes will give than the construction method. So, if I have to make a decision between a better construction and an inferior fitting last or an inferior construction and a better last, I would go for the fit any time.
Strangely in all this hoo-haa about construction, nobody has mentioned the most important thing about shoes: the title of the John Lobb history ""The last comes first". I have rather slim feet and hands (glove size ladies' size 8 fits me better than men's 7 1/2). In ready-to-wear shoes I take a 9 C or 9 1/2 B (American sometimes 10 A). What good is Vass to me (hand-welted or not) when, as far as my foot is concerned, they fit only the abominable snowman. I refuse...
That "How an oxford should fit" is a bit debatable. To me the shoe is too loose, and, if I remember correctly the shoe was tightened after the fitting. Calf leather will stretch more in one direction than the other one. An English shoe will always be cut "tight to toe" (some continental shoe traditions seem have different rules), which means there will be little stretch lengthwise but more in the circumference. So with wear that instep gap will reduce (by maybe 1/4", 6mm)....
Someone pointed this out when the video was first shown a few years back. Apparently only 20% of Grenson's production space is actually used. As the correspondent at the time said, they just plonked a few people in front of the cameras into an unused production space.Also did you see the protagonists were quite warmly dressed? That big factory hall might not have been heated.
Doesn't any manufacturer do that, whatever they produce cars, watches, televisions?They all demand you use their authorized workshop and only have the manufacturer's genuine spare parts built in.
Shoe manufacture worldwide has been on a permanent decline, ever since the heydays on the eve of WW1. In the 1970s and 80s the closure of shoe factories (and suppliers of shoe materials) reached epidemic proportions. Some ten years ago there was another tough spell for the remaining few to get through: all Northampton factories worked part time. At present the situation is reasonably settled, but who knows what is just around the corner.Did you ever consider, that what you...
There are a couple of things with this shoe that are not typical of the way modern bespoke shoes are made: The ‘stay-stitching’ (preventing the quarters to be ripped off) is done by machine. These days, virtually all English bespoke shoes will have that stay stitch done by hand, some 4 or 5 stitches across in a heavier thread, introducing a different texture, sometimes even in a contrasting colour. It’s rather like the cut-through sleeve buttonhole in a bespoke coat....
This is the shoe in question:Here are more images of that particular style: [[SPOILER]] It used to be one of Grenson’s bestsellers: 2-tie, plain toed, V-front in antelope leather. That design just screams 60s!Judging by the number of these shoes turning up on eBay, Grenson must have produced thousands and thousands of it. (If you want to see more, go to google Images “Grenson antelope shoes”.) Althoug I have no access to Grenson's catalogue, I would presume by the early...
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