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Posts by bengal-stripe

You are right, in the most recent version I had made, the stitching goes through one layer of the bellow tongue. But for whatever reason, the bellow tongue on Edward Green's 'Herrick' version is left to 'swing'.(Those 'Herricks' inspired not only my boots but also the boots Jun Kuwana (Foster) and 'poorsod' (G&G) have had made over the last couple of years.)
Maybe those drawings explain it.It’s a kind of booty version of a classic field boot. Main difference the booty opens right up to the top (having two quarters), while the classic version uses a one-piece leg, cut in the lower part to facilitate easier access than a classic riding boot.See how the three pieces fit like a jigsaw puzzle..The only ‘decorative’ seam is the line of stitching going around the eyelets (and even that seam might keep some reinforcement materials in...
Aren't you thinking about a classic saddle stitch where one stitch sits piggy-back on top of the previous one?There the awl (lance-shaped) is employed at an angle. You start-off by marking the stitches with a 'pricking iron' which leaves a slight indentation indicating each awl hole. Each one of these markings is already set at a 45 degree angle. Having the item secured in a 'clam' (or 'stitching pony') you poke the awl hole (one at a time) and then you stitch with a...
It's quite possible that I've seen this previously on Jerry Browne's Cleverley shoes.I just had a quick nose-around on Jun Kuwana's site and Istagram album, showing his forty or so Cleverley bespoke pairs and I cannot see any of his shoes to have the welt marked the very same way.http://cobblersweb.style.coocan.jp/https://www.instagram.com/not_fashion_but_style/I presume, Cleverley works in a similar way then John Lobb (London): regular customers have their orders made by...
I have seen that before (in pictures), but only ever on Cleverley shoes.It is possible that one of Cleverley's 'makers' uses this technique as his usual (or only occasional) trade mark.
Daisuke Yamashita, a Japanese blogger who criss-crosses the world, meeting tailors and shoemakers, has met-up recently with Nicholas Templeman (I seem to remember, DY has “done” NT previously):http://daisukeyamashita.blog28.fc2.com/blog-entry-650.htmlThe text (admittedly in a computer translation) left me somewhat confused:So, this Templeman-guy has been working for the last 82 years as lastmaker: 7 years at John Lobb, 15 years independent; which leaves another 60 years...
I presume, you have those Anthony Delos boots in mind which combine Norwegian with a bevelled waist and a braided heel.https://parisiangentleman.co.uk/2011/07/07/pg-exclusive-first-images-of-masterpiece-by-anthony-delos-best-artisan-in-france/You just have to decide what you want to do, what look you want to achieve, then you prepare the insole accordingly. In this case, a Norwegian fore-part (ball to ball) is followed by a short section of conventional welting and (what...
On the left is an insole prepared for for a conventional welt (all-round 360 degree), while the right insole has been prepared for Norwegian construction. The Norwegian has no outside feather, as the stitching does not come out on top of the welt (inside of the shoe and invisible in the finished shoe). In Norwegian construction the stitching emerges on the outside of the shoe. Once the stitching is in place, the upper leather is folded out to form the “welt”. An insole for...
You can always up the ante and go for the Yves Klein coffee table:Table 'Bleue', 1961
The hides get sand-blasted in the tannery.I think you'll ruin your shoes for good, if you were to attack a pair of finished shoes with a sand-blasting gun.
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