or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:

Posts by bengal-stripe

Lookin' good, buddy!
There are two firms John Lobb. - John Lobb (London) produces only bespoke shoes. http://www.johnlobbltd.co.uk/ The London firm used to have a branch in Paris, which was sold in 1976 to Hermes. Hermes also acquired the right to produce a ready-to-wear range under the John Lobb label. John Lobb (Paris) produces bespoke shoes in their Paris workshop and RTW from their factory in Northampton, England. http://www.johnlobb.com/uk/ Confusing..............isn't it?
It's one hide per shoe (28 cm wide). The shoes are whole-cut and the cut-out leather uses almost all the hide. There are the tails left over and the throats (which might make a nice card case). All the other off-cuts, legs etc. are just scrap and wouldn't even make a watch strap.No, I didn't dare! One day when I know someone who can do "genuine moccasin construction" (with the pleats across the toe which will give added stability, so you can leave-off the toe-puff), I...
At popular request (of a single person), here is an update:That was then [[SPOILER]] that is now:and as I’m at the moment on a loafer roll - here is another one (dk brown shell)As I’m getting older, I even find tying shoelaces a bit of a drag - hence the new discovered love for loafers.
Let's hope, he removes them all. Those staples will go all through the insole and into the last.If he forgets only a single one, it would be impossible to remove the last.
Anthony Delos does use staples! Solid staples, not tiny tacks.He replaces the lasting nails with staples before he starts stitching. Once he finished stitching he pulls out the staplesIt is possible he does it only with Norwegian construction (the stapled shoe I saw him working on in Harrods was also Norwegian), but he might be doing it for conventional welt too.I presume, most people will have seen this video (how could they have missed the staples):06:00 back section...
Thanks a lot, shoefan!Interesting titbit: In the video at 0:50, the lastmaker uses a 'stock knife' (clogger's knife) to shape the last.Until recently it was only Terry Moore (and his trainee Jon Spencer) who are still working with a stock knife. I have heard from an authoritative source, that at John Lobb (London) none of the current crop of lastmakers has experience in the use the stock knife, although the firm has a knife or two standing around to decorate the place....
There was a newsreel on youtube (maybe it's still there, but I can't find it) where Pathé news visited John Lobb in 1948 or 49. At the end of the short feature, the speaker said in the plummiest voice he could muster:"You can have a pair made for yourself, for around ten Guineas!"Presumably at this moment the whole cinema audience would have oooo-ed and aaaa-ed: "Ten guineas, that's ridiculous!!!"A guinea in old currency equals 1£-1sh-0d, or £1.05 in today's money. Putting...
I remember reading somewhere, before WW1 there were more than 1000 bespoke shoemakers in London. Of course, only a minority would have been based in the West-end (the prime shopping district), other firms would have been scattered all over Greater London. Those outside of the West-end wouldn’t have had the fancy premises, nor the prizes of the top West-end firms. Others might have been mainly shoe repairers who ventured occasionally into bespoke shoes. Presumably it was...
Heel and sole edge have been stained transparently to show-off the various layers of leather in the heel. (The alternative would be a heavy, opaque layer of paint that covers everything.) I presume that mark might be some minor damage when the display model was rubbing against something. It is also possible that the leather did take the stain differently.Whatever it might be, the heel can be easily re-finished.
New Posts  All Forums: