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Posts by bengal-stripe

Here I was thinking, during the fitting you were doing an Alan Ladd (1.68 m = 5 ft 6 in) impersonation (standing on a box).
I think in this context "compliment" is correct (four designs which add nice things to the inherent beauty of the last, like a certain dress colour which does compliment your complexion).http://www.future-perfect.co.uk/grammar-tip/is-it-complimentary-or-complementary/In the case of the tie and shirt quoted, you could say either: they both make a set or the two items lift each other onto a higher plane of aesthetic satisfaction.
It's not only these two firms (G&G has taken up that method quite recently) but also a number of Japanese firms do fittings that way.Here is a photo essay showing over some 100 photographs, JLP's method of fitting:http://openers.jp/fashion/fashion_special/photo_tokyo_elements10.htmlIt can be argued, whether this procedure makes a significant contribution to the fit or is just a bit of show business. (Particular as the photographs I have seen, showed in every case quite a...
Obviously, the Cheaney shoe-naming committee must have had a sharp dislike (if not hatred) for Birmingham and Brummies. (For our American friends, the Birmingham population is known as "Brummies", just as the people of Manchester are "Mancunians".)
In this case "welt" and "welting" refers to the little raised dimples in shell cordovan, that can happen if the leather gets wet unevenly.Best method to deal with those is getting the shoes uniformly wet (sponge and water) and letting them dry very gently.
EG could have done worse. Fancy a shoe called "Birmingham"
I believe so http://www.permanentstyle.co.uk/2014/10/gaziano-girling-launches-patina-service.html#.VCxa1vldWSo But there might be limits what can be done with your existing shoes, depending on the leather used and it's colour. Contact Thomas Brunswick at the G&G shop and discuss what he can (or cannot) do.
Yes, it's a bespoke shoe made by John Lobb (St James).The Royal Warrants show the shoes were made prior to 1976 (or 78) when the firm was given another warrant by the Prince of Wales. Since then the output showed three warrants, until maybe ten years ago, when they lost the Queen's warrant, Now they're back to two again.John Lobb (Paris) uses the same signature by the historic John Lobb, but place it larger and lengthwise on the shoe's "sock" (and without the warrants, of...
Now that's a really nice and solid loafer on a no-nonsense last. Much nicer than the usual Italian (and English) precious, prissy and p**s-elegant little number.
It looks to me like a moulded rubber sole (particular as it is stitched "aloft"). Whether JEDDITE is the name of the design (like Dainite or Ridgeway) or the long defunct manufacturer, I wouldn't know.Ask the shoe museum in Northampton. They are very helpful and will be checking their archive to find out.
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