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Posts by bengal-stripe

That's why I am surprised that as late as 1851 the shoemaker would have chosen such an "old-fashioned" last to show-off his skills in such a prestigious venue. After all, the Great Exhibition was all about "modern life". I think, it's fair to presume this boot was made by one of the top firms of the day, not by some village cobbler tinkering-away in his remote backwater.Actually, I found them on this page, those boots are actually a pair and were made by a firm in...
I believe this boot (usually this kind of exhibits were just a single shoe/boot) were made for the Great Exhibition in 1851.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Great_ExhibitionHere is another picture, taken from Daniel's album, which shows the actual last used in comparison to a modern last (Mr W's feet?)It looks like a "symmetrical" last (identical last for left and right foot) which were around that time being replaced with the "asymmetrical" last (one last for the left...
There can't be anybody with a more heart-warming smile than Shoji.
I think, I can tell you what happened.When the upper for a shoe design using elastic (Chelsea boots, Cambridge shoes or loafers with elastic on instep) is made, the closer will stitch a strip of thin, non-stretch tape (Polyester or so) over the elastic. Without that piece of tape which prevents the elastic from stretching during the lasting process, it would be impossible to last the shoe/boot properly. This is normally done on the inside; the tape is caught in the same...
Lookin' good, buddy!
There are two firms John Lobb. - John Lobb (London) produces only bespoke shoes. http://www.johnlobbltd.co.uk/ The London firm used to have a branch in Paris, which was sold in 1976 to Hermes. Hermes also acquired the right to produce a ready-to-wear range under the John Lobb label. John Lobb (Paris) produces bespoke shoes in their Paris workshop and RTW from their factory in Northampton, England. http://www.johnlobb.com/uk/ Confusing..............isn't it?
It's one hide per shoe (28 cm wide). The shoes are whole-cut and the cut-out leather uses almost all the hide. There are the tails left over and the throats (which might make a nice card case). All the other off-cuts, legs etc. are just scrap and wouldn't even make a watch strap.No, I didn't dare! One day when I know someone who can do "genuine moccasin construction" (with the pleats across the toe which will give added stability, so you can leave-off the toe-puff), I...
At popular request (of a single person), here is an update:That was then [[SPOILER]] that is now:and as I’m at the moment on a loafer roll - here is another one (dk brown shell)As I’m getting older, I even find tying shoelaces a bit of a drag - hence the new discovered love for loafers.
Let's hope, he removes them all. Those staples will go all through the insole and into the last.If he forgets only a single one, it would be impossible to remove the last.
Anthony Delos does use staples! Solid staples, not tiny tacks.He replaces the lasting nails with staples before he starts stitching. Once he finished stitching he pulls out the staplesIt is possible he does it only with Norwegian construction (the stapled shoe I saw him working on in Harrods was also Norwegian), but he might be doing it for conventional welt too.I presume, most people will have seen this video (how could they have missed the staples):06:00 back section...
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