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Posts by bengal-stripe

No, they weren't bespoke.Today, one of those 'Patina Artists' might do a good job in dying the whole pair pink and scatter 'hundreds and thousands' (sprinkles) all over.https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SprinklesBut those artists weren't around back then. So the shoes had to go.
Don't forget the stitches in the outseam are far closer together than those in the inseam. So the chance of hitting the outseam stitches full on (particular with the huge screws used in the mountaineering boot) and cutting them is far greater. I have just put one of the Triumph plates (the ones with the screws far away from the front edge) onto a fully-prepared insole and the screw holes will hit the centre of the holdfast. Stitch length for insoling is about 4...
Now that’s a bit of a whopper (and presumably will make a hell of a noise) :http://www.crockettandjones.com/news/index/the-turner-twins--question-mt-elbrusI do believe, that those screws (probably 3.5 mm) will cause damage, particular as they seem to sit directly on top of the out-seam.But, torn thread or not, as long as the screws are in place, they will hold it all together.There will never be the need to replace the ironmongery, even less so, the actual soles.
I don't know about Suzuki, but here are my "Marquess" shoes with Triumph plates:I'm not sure why you believe three (or even five) screws would cause mortal damage to the welt seam, but a dozen or more nails would not. The screws are very small, either Nr. 1 or 2 (1.5 or 2 mm). I haven't got any pins (nails) to measure, but I would guess the diameter is about 1.5 mm. The thread for the welt stitching is twisted from individual strands, so the point of any nail or screw is...
Even Jun Kuwana, who might well have the largest shoe collection in the world (55+ bespoke pairs), suffers from excessive wear at the toes.http://www.styleforum.net/t/501277/now-thats-what-i-call-obsessiveHere is a recent entry on his instagram page:https://instagram.com/not_fashion_but_style/Foster & Son (no doubt, one of the finest shoemakers in the world) had no hesitation to fix a pair of “Lulus”, even as an afterthought and repair.
Even Jun Kuwana, who might well have the largest shoe collection in the world (55+ bespoke pairs), suffers from excessive wear at the toes.http://www.styleforum.net/t/501277/now-thats-what-i-call-obsessiveHere is a recent entry on his instagram page:https://instagram.com/not_fashion_but_style/Foster & Son (no doubt, one of the finest shoemakers in the world) had no hesitation to fix a pair of “Lulus”, even as an afterthought and repair.
Just sling an elastic rubber band over the tassels to keep them in place when the shoes are stored. No need for fancy gadgets.
Swaine Adeney Brigg were away from the London retail scene for maybe a year and then settled in one of the shops in Piccadilly Arcade, occupying maybe 20% of their former space. I presume, but I don't know for certain, they are now under different owners. http://www.swaineadeneybrigg.com/swaine-adeney/
Heel plates, flush or otherwise, make hell of a noise. Did you check that those people you heard walking in malls wore toe plates and not heel plates?The only time a toe plate makes a noise is when you walk down stairs (down only, not up) and you hit the floor at a landing. This is the only situation where you'll hit the floor with the toe first.
Up to 50 or so years ago, bespoke shoes and superior ready-to-wear shoes would have had all-leather top-lifts. To prevent them wearing down too quickly, a large row of nails were put all around the heel (sometimes an additional second row was placed on the back).Nevertheless, despite the nails, these heels wore down very quickly. In the 60s the top-lifts with the rubber corner, which we know today were introduced and have become the standard since. In the late 90s, RLPL...
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