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Posts by bengal-stripe

Even Jun Kuwana, who might well have the largest shoe collection in the world (55+ bespoke pairs), suffers from excessive wear at the toes.http://www.styleforum.net/t/501277/now-thats-what-i-call-obsessiveHere is a recent entry on his instagram page:https://instagram.com/not_fashion_but_style/Foster & Son (no doubt, one of the finest shoemakers in the world) had no hesitation to fix a pair of “Lulus”, even as an afterthought and repair.
Even Jun Kuwana, who might well have the largest shoe collection in the world (55+ bespoke pairs), suffers from excessive wear at the toes.http://www.styleforum.net/t/501277/now-thats-what-i-call-obsessiveHere is a recent entry on his instagram page:https://instagram.com/not_fashion_but_style/Foster & Son (no doubt, one of the finest shoemakers in the world) had no hesitation to fix a pair of “Lulus”, even as an afterthought and repair.
Just sling an elastic rubber band over the tassels to keep them in place when the shoes are stored. No need for fancy gadgets.
Swaine Adeney Brigg were away from the London retail scene for maybe a year and then settled in one of the shops in Piccadilly Arcade, occupying maybe 20% of their former space. I presume, but I don't know for certain, they are now under different owners. http://www.swaineadeneybrigg.com/swaine-adeney/
Heel plates, flush or otherwise, make hell of a noise. Did you check that those people you heard walking in malls wore toe plates and not heel plates?The only time a toe plate makes a noise is when you walk down stairs (down only, not up) and you hit the floor at a landing. This is the only situation where you'll hit the floor with the toe first.
Up to 50 or so years ago, bespoke shoes and superior ready-to-wear shoes would have had all-leather top-lifts. To prevent them wearing down too quickly, a large row of nails were put all around the heel (sometimes an additional second row was placed on the back).Nevertheless, despite the nails, these heels wore down very quickly. In the 60s the top-lifts with the rubber corner, which we know today were introduced and have become the standard since. In the late 90s, RLPL...
My advice still stands: don't ever go for bespoke if you cannot imagine how something in a different design or a different colour would look on you.G&G is probably the only place left where you can get a certain design made-up on the last of your choice. EG used to do that, but have stopped doing so in recent years. Now a certain design (even made-to-order) is only available on one or two lasts (but of course in all the different sizes and width the last is available), C&J...
I believe the G&G shop on Savile Row has a fitting sample shoe in every size, width and last they produce. So you can try on every variation to find the best fit for your feet. But that sample pair might not come in your preferred style. Just think how many pairs the shop ought to stock to provide a sample pair of every possible combination.If you cannot see (in your mind's eye) how a particular style might suit your foot (having established the right size by a sample in a...
Silvano Sassetti does (or at least used to do) quite a lot of work for Ralph Lauren.http://www.silvanosassetti.it/
I do believe those boots are not bespoke, but part of his recently launched ready-to-wear collection.http://www.theshoesnobblog.com/2015/03/norman-vilalta-rtw-and-us-trunk-show-debut.html
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