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Posts by bengal-stripe

Let's keep it Japanese. Fudge wheeled work at it's finest: Marquess Shoji KawaguchiNice opinions you have of your colleagues.......so modest, so balanced!
How many experienced shoemakers have you observed working with a fudge wheel? How many of those had difficulties operating the wheel around the toe area? All English "makers" (and as far as I know French ones too) work exclusively with a fudge wheel.Here are two samples of wheeled outsole work, (Sorry, I haven't got a macro lens. That's as close as I can get). The first one is in Norwegian construction with the upper leather folded to the outside (which is apparently more...
Agreed! - But the pièce de résistance is the extremely narrow cut welt ("just-show-stitches" has become a quite rare beast) and the delicately and transparent finished natural welt and sole edge.Far too many shoemaker use that thick, opaque, dark-coloured paint (is it maple syrup?) that gets slapped all-over and will hide a multitude of sins.
The number of stitches depends on the thickness of the sole and the type of shoe: it will be something like 9/spi for a heavy (or double) soled country shoe or boot; 10/spi for a town shoe (6 mm sole); 11/spi for a lighter "casual" (loafer), maybe down to 12/spi for an extra-light summer loafer.Kielman seems to adhere to what apparently is the standard in Central/Eastern Europe: 1/2 Paris Point (PP=6.67 mm), which makes 3 stitches to the centimetre (or 71/2/spi). (Scheer...
Short of contacting the closer and asking him/her whether the choice of different needles was based on design or convenience, we'll never find out. I based my estimate of 14 stitches/inch on the toe cap seam and presumed that the toe cap 'plateau' is about 3" wide. As that row of stitching you refer to is supposed to resemble very fine gimping, it might be possible the closer did increase the stitch length at this point.Currently the standard of British bespoke closing is...
Judging by the picture, it appears to me the closer has used a different stitch length and a different needle to do the top line and the main body of the shoe.The stitches along the top line are slanted and sit piggy-back on top of the next one (same effect asyou get in fine hand stitching using a lance shaped awl). To get that look in machine stitching, you use a "narrow wedge point" needle, I would guess the stitch length is maybe 10-11/inch.The main closing work seams...
It might look like cork in the picture, but I think it is the insole in the process of being "blocked" ("crimped").The underside of a properly made bespoke last should reflect all the "hills and dales" of the sole of your foot (unlike commercial lasts which are more or less flat). The first step would be to get the (so far flat) insole to acquire the shape of the last. The wet insole is tacked to the last, let to dry and has then taken on the "landscape" of the...
Yes, a larger waist will bring an increase in all the circumference measurements (hips, thighs etc.).
Any tannery can produce a "hatch grain" type leather (calling it whatever they want). All it needs is a metal drum with the appropriate pattern which gets rolled over the wet leather, leaving an imprint of the pattern in the leather. The Horween produced leather that AA Crack, (leather merchants in Northampton) offers is just one variation. Saint Crispin also uses a hatch grain type leather (no idea who produces it).Before Crack got supplied by Horween, they had bought a...
It's a bovine leather but it comes from an older animal.It might be a heifer (cow that has not calved yet) or a mature cow.
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