or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:

Posts by bengal-stripe

Overall size of the case (including lugs) is 23 x 39 mm, while the actual watch measures 23 x 27.5 mm.That's the size of the original 1930s model. The recent '1931 Tribute' was a size bigger at 27.5 x 46 mm.I do like the small size. It's my 'chic and simple' dress watch.
That's my Reverso "Art Deco" from the mid-late 90s which I bought second-handat auction some ten years ago (the picture is the one from the catalogue).The watch is the 'classic' size (23 mm wide) and by modern standards tiny(I have been asked whether this was a ladies watch).The unfashionable size is probably the reason why I got the watch quite cheaply.
Unless you are a shoemaker, you won't have any use for a last (the mould over which a shoe is made). Are you talking about shoe trees? The way Church's marks it's shoes '75' means size 7½ (English size, presumably); 'G' is a wide fitting and '82' is the number for that particular design of last (shoe manufacturers usually name their shoes but number their lasts).
Of course, the size of your feet can change during the day, particular if your feet are fleshy (as opposed to bony). They can swell in hot climate and also at the end of the day, having been enclosed for hours in a worm and humid environment (shoes). Are you wearing your shoes with socks of a similar weight/thickness? If the shoes fit nicely with fine dress socks, they will be tight when worn with heavy sport socks.
Interesting design: a Derby Saddle shoe (don't think I've ever seen one). You kept that one under wraps. Are they fully bespoke (I presume so) or does 'il Quadrifoglio' offer some semi-bespoke service? Did you conduct it all via long distance or did you meet up with Kunai Atushi in Taipei?
You might be able to overcome the problem by using a very large blocking (crimping) board, which means the leather gets pre shaped and you start cutting the pattern into a three-dimensional piece of leather (not a flat piece on your workbench).
So, that must be 'Winot' who couldn't resist the call: "Giz us a twirl" and is putting the boots through their paces.https://www.instagram.com/p/BKu-5kOADdO/?taken-by=dwegan1982]
What style / colour did you settle for? --- Inquisitive minds (read: 'Nosy Parkers') want to know.
Are you sure, your shoemaker suggested using upper leather as lining for for the vamp area?Lining the quarters in upper leather and lining the vamp in "horse" is the traditional way for English bespoke dress shoes. Never for country-type shoes, never for 'casuals' (loafers). Traditionally this was restricted only to black shoes (if it wasn't black, it wasn't a dress shoe). 'Opera pumps' and other evening shoes were traditionally lined in bright red kid, echoing the red...
There is one big difference which you haven't mentioned so far: one shoemaker (Shoji/Marquess) uses a fudge wheel, while Yohei employs a stitch-marker. The look is quite different, the fudge wheeled welt has a chamfer on the outside, while with the stitch-marker the ridges get cut off abruptly. Now DW will come in singing the praises of the stitch-marker (because he uses it), you might find that welt 'more distinct' but I find it a rather crude method. (I presume the...
New Posts  All Forums: