New Posts  All Forums:

Posts by bengal-stripe

Alan McAfee, founded in 1840 (or thereabouts) was a bespoke shoemaker in Dover Street. At some point they branched-out into ready-to-wear which was sold from RTW shops, keeping the original store bespoke only. The RTW collection was produced by various Northampton factories. (My sole remaining pair is definitely C&J.)By the early/mid 80s they had probably 3 or 4 RTW shops scattered over London town. Come the late 80s, the company went under. After the company's demise, the...
His name is Shoji Kawaguchi.
The question was about the length of the heel. The width (at least at the top) is a given: that depends on the width of the last and (possibly) the construction. So should the length of the heel solely be decided by the length of the last (25% of SLL)? Or, alternatively, should the width of the foot/last (equivalent of AAA to EEE width) and/or the width of the sole (narrow dress-welt vs.heavily welted, triple-stitched Norwegian) have a influence on the length of the...
But a conscientious maker will want to know the outcome before he starts working. Hence the pencil mark on the sole showing the desired length and curvature of the heel:(this is the actual narrow-heeled shoe in the previous photograph)The heel-lifts are only pre-cut as they are supplied by the Baker tannery in 7" (18 cm) squares, providing four heel lifts. They are not random leather pieces picked from the floor, so you don't have to decide the size of the heel by what you...
Here is a demonstration of the square(ish) approach to heel length: Both shoes were made on the same last. The right one is a boot in Norwegian construction with two rows of stitching running all around the heel, the left one is a dress shoe welted breast to breast with narrow heel. Width of the heels are 84 and 70 mm; length, measured into the centre of the heel breast, are 81 and 68 mm respectively. Using 25% of the Standard Last Length, in this case 292 mm...
Hope the finished product will exceed all your expectations.
That is something frequently done in bespoke English shoes: the back- lining (but not the front-lining) and the 'sock' (insole cover) are cut from the same leather than the uppers. I believe it was traditionally only done with black lace-up shoes, but is now also used with brown shoes; but not for boots or 'casuals' (loafers).EG, JL Northampton and G&G have taken up that practice (at least for some models). When you place a MTO job with one of these companies,ask for your...
Don't get hung-up on a name! - You can make any shoe, whether the construction is welted, Norwegian or Goyser, as subtle or as garish oops bold as you like. Play it the other way round: find pictures of a construction you like and which you think would be stylistically appropriate for your next pair. Let Nicholas work out how to do it.To come back to Veldtschoen: As far as I know, it employs a welt and then attaches the sole by stitching through the turned-out upper,...
Take it from JMW: The Chasse http://www.jmweston.fr/en/derby-chasse-a-talon-baraquette-cousu-a-la-main-cousu-norvegien-17856 and the Demi-Chasse http://www.jmweston.fr/en/derby-demi-chasse-double-semelle-talon-baraquette-et-bouts-acier-encastres-cousu-goodyear-17812 Depending on the last and the details, you can make either design as a heavy country shoe or as smart town shoe (but probably not for the most formal occasions.) As I said, nail the design, then think...
Simon Crompton had the very same problem with his first pair of bespoke shoes: https://www.permanentstyle.com/2010/09/bespoke-shoes-at-cleverley-part-9.html By adjusting the last (in your case, it might be only the left one) and re-lasting over the reduced last, the problem got solved. The same with the instep. Shaving a bit off the instep will leave the laces on the right shoe a bit more open. If you feel the left is too open, addition of a small bit of leather will...
New Posts  All Forums: