or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:

Posts by bengal-stripe

Jesper is preparing the ground to borrow the shoes from time to time:"Just chuck them across fjord, sound and Skagerrak in my direction!"
Do all you ex-Vikings have identical feet? - To sell shoes in Scandinavia must be a doddle!
As the photograph comes from the company's web-site, we can be fairly certain the shoes are unworn.http://ndcmadebyhand.com/collections/aw14-man/
I’m not so sure about that.“Brothel-creepers” of the late 50s used to lay pretty flat on the groundas do those “licorice-allsorts” shoes Prada had in their collection a year or two agoEnglish equestrian boots have very little toe spring (usually less than shoes)John Lobb (London)while American cowboy boot have oodles of toe spring. Is it really for just walking or do they introduce a particular walk, a kind of ‘John Wayne swagger’, which the owner of the boots might...
It is the flexibility or rigidity of, primarily, the sole and, ultimately, the entire shoes that decides the “right” degree of toe spring. On the one end of the footwear spectrum you have the Dutch clog whose rigid totally inflexible wooden sole determines the the curvature of the bottom; on the other end is the ballet slipper (I’m not talking about pointe shoes) which is designed to be flexible and the nearest thing to barefoot. A classic opera pumps with a thin sole,...
"Two inches" refers to the overall circumference, (in this case in the waist): this means one inch on either side. Two inches on either side is likely to be very, very tight.
The booze, the booze........an occupational hazard and.the short-cut to ruin for more than one talented shoemaker.
Sabbage (Golding, vol.4, page 202) defines "shover" like this:Admittedly, Sabbage's shover covers also the top of the vamp and not just the cone but it is essentially a leather fitting-up piece to be glued or nailed in place and not to be used with a wedge that gets banged or shoved in (where presumably the name comes from).It seems these days the term is used for a fitting-up piece that goes from the vamp point (or slightly beyond) up the cone increasing in thickness....
Is the term "instep cone" your invention or G&G's? - That fitting-up piece is normally known as a "shover" in the shoe-trade .Impress the G&G boys the next time by asking for a shover to be fitted.
Exciting prospects for the both of you: Now you can borrow each other's shoes. - That should save a bit of money!
New Posts  All Forums: