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Posts by bengal-stripe

Although, strictly speaking, Sexton is not a Savile Row tailor (he is based several miles away from the row), stylistically and price wise he belongs very much to Savile Row. He is also one of the most expensive tailors in London. Also, Sedwell and Sexton have a very distinguished and somewhat mannered house style (which you either love or loathe). I believe the OP is looking for someone more middle of the road, as far as style and price are concerned.Someone like Graham...
That's a vicuña overcoat, as worn by Joe Gillis (William Holden) in 'Sunset Boulevard' (1950) In previous scene, you see Gillis being taken shopping for a new wardrobe by his sugar-mummy Norma Desmond (Gloria Swanson) and the salesman prompts him: "Well, if the lady pays, why don't you take the vicuña?"
Those side-elastic shoes are made by Corno blu (Jutaca Seigaku), which is a Japanese bespoke shoemaker. http://www.cornoblu.info/ https://www.instagram.com/cornoblu/
The problem with a seamless whole-cut is not so much stretching but shrinking. You start by 'blocking' the wet leather over the last, which will show huge folds of leather around the heel. The vamp of the seamless whole-cut is not different from any other old shoe and doesn't need more manipulation than usual. The picture here shows Daniel Wegan from G&G blocking a seamless whole-cut. Notice the initial excessive folds of leather. They have to be lasted into smaller...
Well, those 'custom shoes' seem to have a strange construction (cemented?). If you want 'welts', you pay another $ 225 on top of it. It doesn't say 'hand-welted', I even doubt it's GYW, or even 'welted' as we know it. It might be just a decorative bon-welt glued into place. 'Hand-stitching on the upper costs another $ 225. If that is for a beautiful apron seam, then it is a very reasonable price. If it's just for three stay-stitches on the bottom of the quarters, then...
Grenson used to offer a bespoke shoe like Trickers (hand-welted and out-sawn by machine), but they stopped the program some 10 or 12 years ago. I believe between the wars, many factories would have offered this type of product. Edward Green tried the first 'drop-drawer' program (early 90s) as hand-welted, but got in such an awful mess with deadlines, they had to abandon the hand-welting.The times quoted here for hand-welting seem to forget (accidentally on purpose?) that...
That's what the 'Parisian Gentleman' has to say about Carlos Santos shoes.It corresponds to what I have heard about the company's chaotic administration.I did see the shoes once (shown by the agent) at a German retailer, who was considering buying the collection. (They did not, in the end.)Hopefully the company has solved their problems by now, otherwise the guys in Stockholm might jump out of the Edward Green frying pan into the Carlos Santos fire.
Here you are:http://www.trickers.com/bespoke
I don't know where StC sources it's hatchgrain leather from and if it's the same Horween leather which is used by G&G and other English firms.When the Horween leather was initially released and made-up as shoes, it had significant problems with the finish wearing off. G&G had to strip all the hides and re-dye them. Alfred Sargent (who didn't use the leather a great deal) had the same problems with the finish wearing off as StC has.Whether Horween has solved the problem...
Die, Workwear! met up with Nicholas Templeman on his recent visit state-side and commissioned a pair of shoes from him. The blog jjust published a very interesting piece about the making of the bespoke last and the difference between a (truly) bespoke last and a fitted-up commercial last. http://dieworkwear.com/post/137827721579/the-making-of-a-bespoke-last I presume, a trial pair will be ready for Nicholas' next visit to the USA in April. I for one am looking...
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