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Posts by 32-20

I thought I'd share this interesting number.  http://www.pinterest.com/pin/251638697903634737/
Looks fairly decent around the shoulder and sleeves, though the latter seems a little too close to shirtsleeve length. Easily altered if so. The skirt is too short by two or three inches. The horizontal line across your crotch and the inverted V of the open quarters combine in a conspicuous tear shape. A longer skirt, on the other hand, blurs the distinction between the line of the open quarters and the line of the leg, diverting the eye up and down.
I've come around to the view of getting a basic black dinner suit to start with, since if I got the trousers on their own, it would be difficult to find the precise match in fabric if I wanted to add a jacket later. Slightly cheaper to have them made as a pair, too. However, I never intended to wear a velvet dinner suit. Velvet in general repels me, as does corduroy and suede. Something about the gloss...   So, to ask a new question, having rethought my premise: How do...
And I've taken it into consideration. I'm now trying to figure out a degree of formality between black tie and a lounge suit - in other words, a smoking jacket fit for wearing out in public. Bottle green is unconventional and therefore less formal, but that doesn't mean it's exiled from that stratum of formality, any more than a brown lounge suit is left with norfolks and blazers. Both are at the margins of their class, but remain within it, just about. Maybe you dislike...
 Except midnight blue. All I'm proposing here is a midnight green, on an otherwise completely orthodox dinner suit. Or jacket - if there's such thing as semi-semi-formal I think bottle green might fit nicely into that category.
Fellas, how do you feel about a bottle-green dinner suit? That is, an is-that-black-or-do-my-eyes-deceive-me shade of green. The lapels (peak) would be black grosgrain.
I ordered a three piece suit from Lee Baron and had my first fitting a few days before Chinese New Year. When I selected a material and asked for the price, I was given a low figure - I was surprised, then specified that I wanted full canvassing and no fusing, and the figure jumped up to around 7800 HKD. Definitely not a place for the untutored - that omission was almost literally a tourist trap. I paid half in cash, presented the Indian fellow with a scrapsheet of photos...
Quite detailed. I provided a scrapsheet of example photos - a gorge height example, Jim Cagney raising his arms in a jacket with gloriously high armholes, a picture of some Phineas Cole open quarters, a H. Huntsman straight shoulder; and a pic of double vents, as I wasn't sure of the fluency levels before I went in. The only thing they couldn't do on the sheet was a biswing, which is to say, shoulder pleats. Well, Andy advised against it with thick fabric, and I took this...
YWY is legit. I asked about fusing etc. and their default is canvassing; I provided a printout of my style specifications, and they followed it faithfully; at the fittings, they prompted me for my opinion on subtler stylistic details (skirt length, lapel width.) I think it was Andy who suggested a slightly higher button stance, and basically asked for the go-ahead, rather than making presumptions; also slightly longer jacket sleeves. I assented to these suggestions to good...
I'm considering a soft, distinctly indoorsy jacket/coat to lounge around in. Since I don't want to be too aware of my clothes when I'm relaxing, it'll have a 1920s-style soft shoulder - But to come to the main point, I want to be able to sit down with it buttoned up and not worry about straining the buttoning point. Is there a way to pull this off with a high-stance single-breasted front, or should I go with double breasted to distribute the strain more evenly?
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