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Posts by Clouseau

I think this picture was used for the cover of a reggae album or compilation. I'm sure you know...
The second picture has already been posted, but i'm not sure with the first one, that i find really interesting and to tell you the truth very close to the look of some "second wave" lads. Not as smart as the guys on the second photo of course, but more relaxed and still ominous at the same time . Speaking of Hawkins, i didn't know they made boots without a DM sole. The boots of the guy with the hat seems to have commando soles, as did "Cherry reds", but did they have a...
I think the guy with the hat looks like the guy in the middle of the second picture (alleged to be Les Kent,but not for sure).Anyway, if the first picture is "first wave" (?), what kind of boots is the lad with the hat wearing, and is the guy next to him wearing a denim shirt ?
I'm a bit puzzled about this picture (date). Could the lad on the left be Les Kent (from Richard Allen "skinhead" book cover) ?
Lasttye, great pic ! Not sure this one was posted. Smart !
I think "preppy" came after "Ivy League style", and is a natural evolution of the style, less formal, more popular (less elitist, or when Ivy came to the streets), with the adoption of pastel colors and of a more casual/sport style :  for example chino, madras, jean; where Ivy was more into flannels, tweeds, corduroys, regimental ties, grey shades, etc. Of course this is a simplification. I know some people in Europe make the distinction between the two styles, but i don't...
And what about a MA-1 and a Lee Rider, by the same style icon, but a few years later? American main street staple, but very skinhead indeed. And still the military influence.
Formal and for the campus elite :"Ivy league", then less formal and student oriented, wouldn't you rather call that look "preppy"? About J.Press, they do some nice stuff, they still had (two or three years ago, the last time i saw one of their shop abroad. We only have BB here. And no i don't mean Brigitte Bardot) a large choice in three buttons jackets and blazers.
As said Browniecj: "The Ivy League was greatly influenced by British and Continental Fashion, with an American "Feel". A mix of clothes (mainly of British origins), habits (for example loafers worn without socks is a very old habit in south of France and Italy), and American manners and attitude. I think WW2 plays a part in the game too : US military haircuts, and the way some items were worn . Mods & suedeheads were used too to style mixing: French cuts, English suits,...
Not "pure" Ivy league for sure, Roytonboy. But from what i understood of your post, you were also interested by the Ivy league influence and adaptation by non-americans. The so-called Minets mixed French, English, and American influences. See the pictures of them in "The Kennedy look" (Ivy league style in their idea), it's not pure Ivy at all, like i think the mods, skinheads, and suedeheads of the 60s.A picture i took at the "Renoma exhibition", i already posted at the...
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