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Posts by roytonboy

To be honest, I can't remember. There were certainly no gangs who called themselves "Anytown Suedeheads" unlike the numerous, "Crossley Skins", "Royton Skins" , "High Crompton and Heyside Boot Boys" (Although it was actually HCHBB - they weren't painting the Sistene Chapel!) you saw sprayed all over the place between 1969 and 1971. My guess is that once the Richard Allen book 'Suedehead' hit the streets that some of the younger lads probably did. My memory of the 'look'...
 So, for some, there was a very clear 'Suedehead' look for a time, which maybe only lasted for about 6 months. I had that look though I probably never actually called myself a Suedehead, no doubt others,of a certain age, would have referred to me as such. I regard 'Suedehead' as the death throes of the Mod-Skinhead look. From this stage on (Spring 1972) youth fashion pretty much melded  into one and there was little difference between a bootboy, glam-rock followers, rock...
I think that the perception of the term 'Suedehead' is governed by age and, to a degree, locality. Whereas older skinheads who were ready to move on were happy to grow their hair and go a bit more mainstream in their clothing, younger followers of the style still wanted their own look. We had an interesting few pages of discussion on this starting on page 1238. Thus, people such as former forum member Cerneabbas were aspiring Suedeheads, having been too young to be...
 I would say it was THE major influence in spreading the style and in growing the numbers. It was the reason I and all my skinhead mates got into to look - I can't remember a skinhead lad who wasn't into football. I would go as far as to say it was our only real influence at first, apart from older local lads, who were also football fans. Once we were a bit older and started to go to the local Soul Club, that also had some influence but the main one was always the football...
 Yes, my apologies Newton Heath, welcome. I agree with your definitions with the slight exception of 'Smoothies'.With us (about 6 miles away!) the term Smoothie was already in use in early 1971 (i.e. late Skinhead but pre-Suedehead) It was a complementary term used for someone in the most up-to-date Skinhead clothes but whose hair was longer - probably collar length, but short at the front , meaning he looked 'smooth' as opposed to the more aggressive appearance of the...
 I thought that recent photos posted on here demonstrated that it wasn't a creation, but something that evolved. There were certainly short haired football hooligans at Manchester City in season 1967/68 when I started attending regularly. Aspects of their style and behaviour were clearly forerunners of the skinhead. By the Autumn of 1968 they had the whole Skinhead look - we just didn't know that term then. I don't doubt that similar lads were to be found in Liverpool,...
 NH - Yes, as the name suggests, I'm originally from Royton, just up the road, 15 -20 minutes by number 24 or 90 bus (as it was in those days!)   I never considered myself to be a Mod. Having said that I got my first item of late Mod/early Skinhead clothing from Lewis's in Manchester in 1967(which kind of underlines my statement about 'Mod' becoming mainstream!) I bought Levi's from a tiny shop in an arcade in Rochdale, little more than a kiosk, really (there were two, on...
 As they say of Jamaica - "from many, one."
 Was Rodney Harrington an 'Ivy League' student? If so, at which college? I would have thought that the Harrington jacket proves my point.  By the mid '60's young Mods were getting their influences from what was available in the shops, what they saw on 'Ready, Steady, Go' and what the Who and the Small Faces were wearing.  The 'Harrington' jacket became popular because people had seen it on the television and thought it was a smart jacket, not because it was 'Ivy League'...
 As I said: "Now it was astute clothing retailers who were deciding what items to stock and anyone could go into a boutique and be sold stuff" As you have written, the original source is lost.  'Harringtons' were originally produced in the north west of England and worn as golf jackets - doesn't that then mean that north west golfers were an influence on skinhead? I think we are all agreed that some of the clothes we wore were also worn by (or similar to)  Ivy Leaguers at...
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