or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:

Posts by Bob the Badger

 To this day I distrust the police. Back then, on a couple of occasions, I was nearly 'fitted up' for things I hadn't done.The police were generally drawn from the same working class people that I was a part of but we were taught from a young age not to trust them. I am surprised that even cousins in their 60/70s still have a strong dislike for the old bill even though we now all lead respectable middle class lives.One of our mates became a policeman and even won a bravery...
One legacy, already mentioned, was the DM boots. The boots were originally intended as workwear and were adopted by skinheads and perhaps late mods, but essentially skinheads as leisure wear. Almost every youth movement in the UK since has discovered the DM boot but I would argue skinheads were the first. Skinheads were magpies adapting clothes, music etc from elsewhere. Without skinheads Desmond Dekker would not have had his hits and his world recognition. Many West...
Back then I didn't know any girl who had a tattoo or body piecing apart from the ear lobes. None of my mob had tattoos and I would say it wasn't a skinhead look in our area but when Aces posted on a Simon Templar Saint tattoo I remember a mate who had that tattoo. Generally it was all low key and discrete. Most of us were concerned with getting good jobs and that would not be possible with a large tattoo or piercing. I remember in my 20s some of the chaps started wearing...
Enameled football badges were also a bit of a no-no in our area for reasons given above but some of us used to go to West Ham Speedway and you could wear those badges anywhere because there was never any violence at the Speedway. It was a family sport back then with no trouble and you could safely travel away to Wimbledon,Hackney,Romford or Rye House.
The white BD shirt has always been part of my wardrobe. My first Ben Sherman was stripped but I quickly started to buy plain colours including white. Some dance halls introduced ultra violet lighting and a white shirt really stood out. We wore the white shirts with our blazers (adding to the school uniform look). For summer I preferred the baggy sleeved, loud check, America import shirts from the Squire shop..
I think it is great to read what Closeau has to write regarding the Minets, quote; 'At the time, you bought the  Renoma Blazer (all the Minets wanted one) and choose a patch you had to saw yourself'.   We didn't have a clue about Minets (we didn't know about anything outside London and the Suburbs) but a much forgotten part of what we wore when 15/16 was the Initialed Blazer. The blazer had to be 3 button, patch pockets,centre vent and navy/black. We got the pocket...
A mate of mine ended up with a lime green one that at the time we all thought was great. Another friend had a almost brilliant white one. We never went down the two-tone route though. I can't remember what casual jacket if any I bought after that (in the 90s I had a Ralph Lauren) but I did have a Levi jean jacket for a while when it all started to go wrong in the 1970s
Regarding jeans, everyone in my area wanted Red Tab 501's in the mid late '60s. The type you sat in the bath in and waited for them to shrink 4 inches in length and 1 inch in the waist. In 1970 I bought a pair of ready shrunk Orange tab Levi's (from Millets?) but I always regarded them as inferior. I then went on to wear Lee Rider jeans and I wear Lee to this day. Like many of us I still bought Levi cords and Sta Prest in 68/69/70. Jeans sold today bare no comparison to...
My Mob bought their first Harringtons (Baracutas) from the Squire shop (He did sell them then) in late 1969. I remember that I was a bit dissapointed because I thought Harringtons were American (after watching Peyton Place) and mine had 'Made in England' on the label. Mine was bottle green and we all tried to have different colours but not black . I seem to remember that black became the main colour for knock-off Harringtons as sold in Millets and in the market. What...
The Kickers look like something you would buy for a five year old. Many 'adult' clothes today seem to be an extension of what childrens' wear is. Men dress like overgrown babies and children.   Going back to boots I vaguely remember rubber-soled commando boots. In the late '60s you were never far away from an Army and Navy store that supplied cheap clothing and footwear. I bought officer boots and jungle greens from an A&N near Fords motor works.They generally sold to...
New Posts  All Forums: