or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:

Posts by Big Texas

The American man, he is fat man, with wheatbelly. He enjoy a food and coka coka. He is a no good fat. His belly is fill with pizza and candies, this is useless for a slim shirt.
On a side note, what a wild and awesome approach to a new label. It's sort of like a concept album meets designer collection, with high-quality goods and a strong stylistic point of view. I'm intrigued.
Sweaters are a category more interesting in theory than in practice. In theory, they're a great, semi-leisurely way to appear "smart" in a casual setting, in the European sense of the word. In practice, they're used by dullards in business casual settings in lieu of jackets, or by awkward slobs on first dates. Most Americans who wear them don't seem to know how to wear them, or what kind to wear, and when. And so the sweater beguiles and bedevils people. Few things look...
Stitchie, looking good. That outfit sort of cries out for tobacco suede shoes, IMO, but perhaps that would push things just a little bit over the boundary of good taste and into hipster/twee territory (especially given your luxurious beard). Not sure.
Sure. All of which takes this back to Manton's original point, pre-philosophical-divergence, which is that a) there are degrees of coherence and success in the application of taste, and therefore, b) there is such a thing as "good" taste (and its converse, "bad" taste). This holds true whether we choose to define taste as some sort of absolute standard, or as a relative standard, or as an objective standard or a subjective one.For the sake of argument, let's define "taste"...
  True, although there is a current in modern philosophy -- perhaps ironic, in context of your assessment -- that harkens back very deeply to the convergence of science and philosophy as espoused by, say, Pythagoras and his ilk.   Nowadays we hear all this talk of golden means and ratios, symmetry of aesthetics as hardwired biological preference, etc. While it's true that modern thought has largely attempted a fact/value separation, it's sort of backed into a conflation...
Ralph Lauren does this to interesting effect, e.g., in some of the RLPL advertisements. That being said, I've never been a huge fan of overtly "country" patterns (such as tattersalls) in smooth poplin or broadcloth. To my eye, they just look like an awkward compromise that fulfills the promise of neither the weave nor the pattern.Not all non-city patterns are country patterns, obviously, but those that are should be kept in fabrics a bit closer to their roots, IMO.
Gucci horsebit loafers are classic, although they have their strong lovers and haters in places like SF. Personally speaking, I'm a big fan. As to that particular color shown in the photo shoot: it's interesting and rakish, and it's one of the standard-issue Gucci colorways, but I don't find it as versatile or appealing as some of the darker browns. YMMV.
Linen is all well and good, but if you're looking for something a little bit more versatile (i.e., passable in a more buttoned-up business setting), then wool is the way to go. Hopsack or fresco can wear very cool in the summer, especially if the blazer is unlined or quarter-lined. They're also nice in that they don't wrinkle as noticeably or incorrigibly as linen does.   Nothing wrong with linen, per se, but if this is your first blazer -- or your only blazer --...
There is a distinctive look about a suit that was clearly too big and was drastically altered to fit. It'll be "off" in a noticeable way, such that the balance of the suit will be thrown out of whack. Front pockets may migrate backward, the quarters and front will look strange, and whatever isn't taken in (shoulders, for instance) will look boxy. At best, it will look like a larger suit that has been shrunk down disproportionately.   I would strongly second the...
New Posts  All Forums: