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Posts by Big Texas

Not sure what your budget is, but if you're willing to spend a bit more than AE, you can get a slightly nicer shoe from forum favorite Rancourt & Co. They offer a slightly sleeker and dressier penny loafer in their Weltline model. It's a beautiful loafer. Still not sure I'd wear it with a suit, but I think you could get away with it every now and then, under certain...
+1Gimmicky, and not in a good way.
The Randolph is the best of those choices. It will not work with a suit, nor will penny loafers in general. A penny loafer is a casual shoe. It will pass as business casual attire these days, but it will not work with a suit. Yes, I know you'll see people doing it. No, you shouldn't emulate them.
Plenty of businesses mandate black trousers. For instance, TGI Friday's and Chili's. Pieces of flare are optional, but encouraged.
I'm not a lawyer, but a long time ago, I worked at a very conservative financial services company that was the focus of a dress code-related lawsuit. Dress codes, especially when they come to dictating what women can and cannot wear, have become something of a minefield these days. Dress codes are totally defensible, and you're within your right to mandate one. But I'd steer away from the Scylla and Charibdys of overly specific prescriptions and overly vague proscriptions....
  As opposed to old men in their 20s? :)   Sorry, couldn't resist. But seriously, this is all relative. I see a lot more three-piece suits -- and more suits, in general -- in NYC than I do in LA or SF. In those latter cities, the suit is almost nonexistent among the general working population. It's concentrated to a relatively small niche of wearers, most of whom seem to work in finance. One of these fellows could pull off a three-piece and look a bit eccentric, though...
I enjoy it, the subtext.
I'm going to go ahead and assume that, given the various possibilities -- personal or staff stylists, bespoke tailor, magazine stylists, promotional wardrobe furnishment, or hanging out on SF -- the most likely explanation is that he hangs out on SF. We can make this assumption pretty safely, given that Al Roker posts here (as Reevolving).
  Tie Bar ties tend to be on the thick side. Not overly thick, like the kind of $5 ties you can get at a bodega on any old street corner. But thick, and heavily lined.   Honestly, I'd caution you once again against getting a bunch of beater ties. I pursued a similar strategy when I was getting started. I ended up with a rack full of 30 or so mediocre ties, and a lot of buyer's remorse. For the same investment, I could have gotten 10 really nice ties. I understand the...
  I would advise against the "bunch of beater ties" strategy, and instead opt for fewer but better. Ties shouldn't take much of a beating, anyhow. Not sure what you're planning to put them through if indeed that's the case.   I'll second what Quadcammer said, though. If you really just need a handful of ties you don't need to baby or give much of a shit about, just go with The Tie Bar. No sense in spending even $30-50 apiece for ties you're going to neglect, when Tie Bar...
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