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Posts by Big Texas

There doesn't appear (or smell) to be that much of a difference between Venetian and the much-worshipped Renovateur. The latter is a bit thicker, but by and large, they both seem very similar.   For the record, I've never been convinced that Reno is a fantastic conditioner. It leaves a decent shine, and this is precisely what makes me suspect that it's not really conditioning. Conditioner should be penetrating the leather and softening it; shining agents should be...
I'm looking for a jean similar in cut to the 3sixteen SL-1XX model (slim, very very mild taper), but in a lighter weight denim that is better suited to hot spring/summer weather. To the best of my knowledge, 3sixteen doesn't go lighter than 14.5oz. I know other makers occasionally do, but which ones have a similar cut? The cut is crucial for me, as I am a damned hard fit when it comes to raws. (A slightly higher rise than the SL would be acceptable, maybe even preferable.)
Not to beat a dead horse on the durability side-note, but I have some Kiton shirts in Riva cotton that have held up to at least 30 cycles (and counting) without any noticeable fraying, or even indications of fraying. I am under no illusion that they'll last another 30 cycles without some significant wear & tear, of course, but...noticeable wear & tear after six cycles strikes me as nuts. Your washer and/or your detergent must be harder on your clothes than you're...
That blows (sorry). If the gum is more or less clumped together in a single mass, you might be able to harden it by running some ice cubes over it. This will make the gum more brittle, allowing you gently to peel it away from the wool. If the gum is too spread out or heavily worked into the fabric, your best bet would be to send the suit over to a specialist, like Rave Fabricare. If they can't get it out, I'm not sure if even G&H can.
The answer to your question depends on how you define "durable" in the context of a particular cotton garment. Mercerization increases the tensile strength of cotton fibers by slightly altering their chemical structure. It also increases their resistance to mold, such as mildew. On the other hand, mercerized cotton is more attractive to dust and other fine, particulate matter. On the balance, these qualities may or may not noticeably affect the durability of your cotton...
Pretending to act cool about the lamp was the wrong way to go, mang. Now she'll never learn. Next time it'll be an even nicer lamp that meets its maker. Or maybe a statue or something (you are classy enough to own numerous statues, right?).The better strategy would have been to fall to the floor, flapping your arms about wildly and emitting a shrill, piercing cry of pain, while occasionally petting or nuzzling the bent lampshade and staring up at the girl, menacingly, like...
Nein.
I would go linen/cotton (or linen/wool) over pure cotton. Cotton is seldom a fantastic jacketing material. It is stiff and lacks drape or flow. It also wears a lot warmer than is generally assumed, especially in a chino weave (twill).
^^ Can't say that I'm a fan of that jacket. The lapels and houndstooth pattern instantly date it, making it look like a vintage jacket from the '70s -- even if it may be brand new. To the extent that "good taste" involves a "timeless" style, or an approximation thereof, I'd say that your jacket seems too of-a-moment.
This. Sort of.While I can't say I'd be thrilled if a brand new tie showed up pre-creased, you have to realize that such creasing often comes with the territory with stiff, heavy, English-style silk ties.You could try (gently) rolling the tie, and letting it sit for a day or so, before unrolling and smoothing it back out (by hand, not iron). You could also try wearing it, crazy as that may sound. It's been my experience that stiff silk ties tend to soften a bit with wear...
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