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Posts by Nick V.

This will be their 6th store in London. It's scheduled to open next month at Canary Wharf, Cabot Place. In the making, shoe care and, repair films will be playing in the shop. Of the 1600 square feet 1100 will be used for retail. There will be a Ladies section promoting the new Ladies Collection designed by Mrs. Jones and Her Daughter Philippa. Also the new Mens fall/winter line will be on display. C&J continues to do a great job growing their brand while maintaining...
Maybe I didn't explain it well but, here is a picture of what I was trying to explain:
This is what I was referring to.
A blind stitch covers the out-sole stitching. It has nothing to do with the stitching that connects the in-seam to the welt.
I wouldn't suggest Super-Glue.It's two rigid and can dry out the leather and stitching making them brittle.The soles are stitched using a lock-stitch method. If a few of them get damaged it doesn't mean the rest will unravel.
Perhaps I didn't do a good job explaining.....I'm not comparing a RTW high-grade to a hand made. We agree that on a HW the void between the insole and out-sole is more shallow than a RTW. I'm also not talking about the quality of the insole. I'm more speaking in terms of forming. In the high-grades made today the filler has a part to play. Possibly a bigger part than years ago. Generally speaking, the foot-bed will compress more under the ball of the foot and pretty much...
I prefer cork. In addition to moisture issues with synthetics they will not mold to the bottom of the foot like cork and, I suppose felt. A few years ago we were working on a very old pair of Cleverley's. The foot-bed was made of some sort of animal (I suspect horse) hair and cement mixture. I suspect that that compound would resist moisture and at the same time, because of the fibers in the hair would be able to shift in order to conform to the bottom of the foot. Two...
If you can get some of this stuff it will help prevent against damage caused by both natural and artificial lighting.http://www.vectraspray.com/Vectra16/vectra16.htm
No, I don't know of anyone who is still using them. I doubt though that they are still around. The problems were 1. finding a mechanic to service them and 2. getting the parts. I was lucky in the sense that I had a mechanic buy the name of George. He was a retired USM mechanic. All I had to do was explain the problem over the phone and he would diagnosis it. He would show up with a jacket and tie with a tool box that was maybe twice the size of a lunch box. He looked more...
I inherited 3 of those USM machines. It was long after the leasing program was terminated. So, I never dealt w/USM directly. The Guys in the shop had been there long before I arrived on the scene. They told me USM would come in and read the stitch count meter and submit a bill. Those machines were beautiful. Equipped with hot wax pots. They would hum with precision and consistency. No other repair shops had them. They were for factory use. We used them until there were no...
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