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Posts by Mark Seitelman

Thanks for the video. Now I know where to buy those clothes that I always wanted (e.g., green reptile skin sportscoat, red cowboy boots, and kelly green fedora).
Keep them overnight in a vat of sulfuric acid. Seriously, sanding will make things worse. A good cobbler can shine them and try to cover-up the scratches. You have to accept scratches in leather shoes. Even house shoes get scratches. Good luck.
Intrinisically, no pocket square is worth more than $100. However, if you were to cross that bridge, the only pocket square that is worthwhile is Hermes which can be resold. No other maker has the cult following.Its mini-scarves many times sell for close to retail or above retail!No other maker approaches it in the resale market. Most average $25 to $40.
I think that the BT suits looks horrible. Too short, too tight. But, if this is the look that you want, go there. It makes no sense going to another tailor and asking him to duplicate another look. Most tailors would refuse.On the other hand, if you want a suit that fits, go to Mr. Ned.Good luck.
Take it to a good and honest tailor. There may be enough "inlays" to let-out the vest. If that fails, then he can tell you whether a new back is possible or whether it would also entail a new lining and would make the job too expensive.
Eight solid navy in all weights, weaves, and configurations. E.g., 8 oz. to 18 oz., SB, DB, 2 piece, 3 piece, flannel (both heavy and light), herringbone, serge, twill, and worsted. Although navy is the building block of a man's wardrobe, I am coming around to Will's thinking that grey looks better as one's hair starts greying. See Will at http://asuitablewardrobe.dynend.com/2012/01/complement-your-coloring.html
I agree with Mr. Despos. It looks like a tired thrift shop suit.Kuppenheimer is remembered today as the platform for the advertising art of JC Lyendecker, one of the great poster, advertising, and magazine cover artists. He created the Arrow Collar Man.
I stand corrected. I must confesss that I jumped to a conclusion, and I did not have the facts.I am surprised about the hole in the Brooks shirt. I have found it consistent.in workmanship and fabric. I have gotten as much wear from my Brooks shirts as any other that own, including the celebrated names. Also, its pricing is reasonable.I guess that even an excellent maker can slip-up. One of the first shirts that I ordered from a celebrated shirtmaker had loose buttons....
If that is the case, I stand corrected. I apologize for the statement.I find it a little odd that three shirts all shrink at the same time after three washings. It would seem to me that this is a sign that that the shirtmaker is using jobbed cloth. When this has happened to me, blame can be placed at the cut-corner of using fabric from a jobber.However, if the shirtmaker is using the "real McCoy" (i.e., Thomas Mason or Alumo), then the problem may be attributed to a bad...
The cotton shrunk. Pure and simple. This is an example of getting what you pay for. They offer a very attractive price, but in the end the cotton is inferior. It is likely that cheap cotton was used, such as from China or India. The cotton might have looked and felt like the good stuff (from England or Italy or Switzerland), but its shrinkage is remarkable. There is a reason why top grade Italian cotton is expensive. You do not get this with a Turnbull &Asser shirt....
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