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Posts by Mark Seitelman

As to buying separate collars, here is my experience. I tried them. I got it of my system. Unless you have the collar highly starched and polished, a soft detachable collar will look no different from a regular one. The old world look can only be accomplished with the starch and polishing. I found the collars uncomfortable with the collar pins poking me in the throat and back of the neck. I also had one shirt where the collar did not align perfectly with the shirt band.
The man to contact is David Hober. I would not think that a pull would not be repairable on a grenadine. It is a knit. I think that re-weavering would apply solely suiting cloths, e.g., worsteds, flannels, etc. Incidentally, in Mr. Hober's care guide he notes that grenadines should be handled with care since they tend to pull. I think that a pull is part of the "cost of doing business" when wearing grenadine. Good luck.
The biggest problem in re-collaring and re-cuffing is fabric matching. You don't want a bright, new collar and cuffs against a faded body.If you have some extra fabric tucked away, often this will be futile because the extra cloth looks new while the shirt's body is worn and faded. This is especially so for colored shirts. Less so for stripes or plaids with a white background.I have had had extra cloth which I had to discard because of fading.Sometimes the shirtmaker...
Funny story. What happened if he were delayed getting to your shop? What did he do when he had to go to an after-work event?In some ancient "how to dress' book I recall that a story of a man who would have two shirts. Dutifully at the end of each day he would wash and iron his shirt. I guess that that could be your bare minimum. With that thinking you would buy only enough food for your home for each day.Amen!I find these lists amusing.I have some duplicates (and in a...
You also have to consider shipping cost and the possibility of damage/loss in transit. The lining is very nice. I have some similar color combinations. I would keep it. The only time that I have ever relined a coat is when I have worn-out the lining. Also, the colored lining gives some life to a charcoal suit. But, if you want a charcoal lining, go for it.
Have Chan pick a lining in either charcoal or black.
It won't hurt the suit. I had a coat relined last Fall for $225 at Brooks. A comparative job on Savile Row would be at least twice that. Ask Chan about the cost. Perhaps they will do it at cost plus shipping. Good luck.
To elaborate:The original poster's complaints are petty. They do not merit the vendors' entry into the mosh pit.Exactly.
To the original poster: 1. Leffot owes you nothing. You cancelled the sale. Indeed, you owe an apology to Leffot because you attempted an end-run around it. 2. Edward Green also owes you nothing. 3. Neither Leffot nor EG have any obligations to answer these complaints in a public forum. 4. If you disagree with the above, go elsewhere. There are plenty of other retailers and manufacturers.
Hickey-Freeman had used the term "customized" on its labels on and off during the years. "Customized" was a trademark. It referred to the manufacturing quality. The tailoring was top quality, i.e., "Number VI" when this numbering system still in use. VI was a handmade suit. Hence, the logo of the tailor's hand and needle. "Customized" does not mean that the suit was made to measure or bespoke or even custom. Indeed, I doubt that H-F did much, if any MTM before the...
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