or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:

Posts by LonerMatt

 Using Socratic discourse to understand the role of clothing as a social signifier. (CMON SOMEONE GET THIS)
 Only if you feel that knowledge exists that has no impact at all.
 So, I suppose my broad point was that, as outsiders looking in, largely lacking this knowledge, it's so easy to be dismissive, but what do we actually know about the usefulness of this? Maybe it was a game changer, maybe it was something that really does change the way people think about change, sexuality, or whatever else.    I'd add to this that I think most people can find as aspect of a field that they enjoy and can cope with the ups and downs of. The idea that...
 ...and to continue this analogy further - those that stick to basic, but fair advice - say investing in index funds and chilling out tend to outperform those that move between a lot of options. As an educator, if anyone told one of my 12/13/14/15/16/17 year old students to 'follow their passion' I'd have to restrain myself from slapping them. That's terrible advice and, more often than not (happy to provide some sources for this if you'd like) leads to dissatisfaction....
Relevant to JM's original post: http://nblo.gs/127PjM   tl;dr - from 1991-2013 the number of students from disadvantaged households participating in University has not changed noticeably, or really at all.
 ...and I think critics are often blindsided by titles and don't respect how much someone has to be able to know, do and communicate to do well in Humanities. For example, one of the people linked to above published an article titled "Recovering Difference in the Deleuzian Dichotomy of Masochism-without-Sadism" - when difference, Deleuze, dichotomy, masochism and sadism all have hyper specific meanings and fields of inquiry (and that's without acknowledging that writing...
 Thanks for the correction!
 TBH, almost everything I've seen from Universities emphasises student enrollments as success, rather than student results (which are incredibly easy to manipulate anyway). I think that we're all informed enough to realise the extent to which using student enrollments as a benchmark for success is nefarious.
 I can't fault anything that you're saying here, and largely agree that the lack ofs ethics lies not necessarily in offering the degree, but in advertising it as a prestigious, assured career path and inflating numbers far beyond what is necessary (which also results in lower entry standards, and often a drop in quality of professionals). Side question - I wonder how many graduates in law actually desire to work as practising lawyers? I will add, though, that in many cases...
 Yeah, I'm of two minds about this. On one hand, my experience in work places and working within professional groups while at University made it significantly easier for me to gain a position in a very competitive field and organisation. In many ways, because this wasn't at University the stakes were much higher and the experience much more varied, complex and communicable. So, I definitely can see that these general soft skills are vital. On the other, I can honestly say...
New Posts  All Forums: