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Posts by Roger

Quote: Originally Posted by bengal-stripe Roger - don't worry! You are my nominee for this years "Josepidal- Prize" (for doggedly persistence). Actually, Bengal-stripe, I had expected you to help clarify this issue since I believe it was a post by you maybe a year or two back--and on this forum or the AAAC one--that provided for me the insights about letters indicating width-fitting and their indexing of volume, rather than merely width, along...
Quote: Originally Posted by Sator I second the nomination. Bravo Roger! Thanks, Sator, but modesty prevents me from accepting the award alone. Since you were there every step of the way, the award should be shared! Bravo, Sator!
Quote: Originally Posted by Manton This has never been one of my favorite styles. Yet these shoes somehow speak to me. Can you let us in on just what they're saying?
Quote: Originally Posted by Sator How in the real world how can you argue that a shoe width measurement cannot under any circumstances have any statistically significant meaning whatsoever (where confounding variables such as brogueing, leather thickness, and external stitching have been properly excluded)? The issue of statistical significance is completely irrelevant in this context. It is a term that characterizes differences between...
I've followed this issue up a little further with a set of measurements and an observation. First the measurements. Although I don't have two pairs of shoes on the same last that differ only in their stated width, I do have some that are on the same last and the same stated size and width. It seems to me that, if we can expect shoes on the same last differing in one letter's width to exhibit a reliable difference in measured width, we can also expect shoes on the same...
Quote: Originally Posted by Sator When may I ask did I ever once state that an increase in width is the only (sic) way makers increased the cross sectional area when going up a letter width? I stated that when you get an increase in the cross sectional area or three dimensional area under the vamp resulting from a step up in letter width, it is extraordinarily unusual for that not to reflect in a measurably discernible increase in the width. When a...
Quote: Originally Posted by Sator It is mathematically difficult to increase the total cross sectional area of an ellipse (which is what a shoe is shaped like in cross section) without increasing the width. Not at all. The increase in width you mention of 3 mm. results in an increase in total cross-sectional area of about 3%. This same area increase can be accomplished by increasing the height of the semi-ellipse (this height being technically...
Quote: Originally Posted by Sator This is more true when comparing the width across the sole alone between different makers. But within a maker, a drop in width will always be measurable as a drop in width across the sole and in the caliper measured width of the uppers. I believe this is incorrect. And I've seen many other forumers indicate that the only accurate metric for width--including width comparisons within one maker's shoes--is the...
Quote: Originally Posted by TheHoff I was going to start a Vancouver Sales Thread but I figured that would be dead quick so I'll just post here. I browsed the Harry Rosen and Holt Renfrew summer sales in Vancouver. Abso...lutely....nothing.......interesting.......... Ok a few slight temptations: Holt -- everything up to 40% off. Which usually meant 10-20% on most things. Charvet ties down to $124. Yay. The new Ralph Lauren store was as lifeless...
Quote: Originally Posted by Sator I measured the width of a 8/8.5D 202 last pair and a 8/8.5D 89 last pair across the sole. I found that the 89 last pair was almost identical to the millimeter in width to the 202 last pair. I also used calipers to measure the width across the widths of the uppers and got the same result. This particular measurement is insufficient to determine width differences. Width refers to volume in the final analysis, and...
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