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Posts by Roger

Quote: Originally Posted by iammatt I mean two things. First, there are only so many changes that can be made of a stock pattern, and they can only be made simply. There is little room for the art of tailoring when you are starting from a block. Second, the process of fitting and refitting, pulling and tugging and shaping is what makes for the difference. It is a dynamic process while MTM is invariably static. The same goes for shirts and pants,...
Quote: Originally Posted by mafoofan Not so. A lot depends on how well your measurer is able to comunicate modifications to the maker. He's got to know what will likely happen when he manipulates a particular measurement of a particular pattern by a particular degree. Thus, a salesperson who has experience dealing with a specific maker may be able to do a lot better than a tailor, even one that is generally competant. I'm not sure I fully agree...
Quote: Originally Posted by iammatt I disagree. They simply cannot make the necessary changes. It is near impossible, IMO. Do you mean that an experienced tailor wouldn't be capable of taking the measurements precisely and expertly enough to render the completed MTM garment a better fit than a RTW garment? I'm not clear about what you mean by "the necessary changes." This thread seems to be concerned mainly with suits and jackets, and...
If it's all right, could we return to the original topic? Wouldn't the quality of MTM depend almost entirely on the skill of the person taking your measurements? If you go the MTM route with some line like Belvest or Isaia, for example, and are measured by a store sales person, I suspect you won't get a great garment. On the other hand, if they made a true tailor available for this, wouldn't you expect to be able to improve on RTW?
Quote: Originally Posted by RJman Until 2003, N&L sold its upper-tier line of RTW shoes under the "Poulsen Skone" brand. N&L purchased Poulsen Skone in the 1970s. In 2003, Dunhill revamped its offerings and began selling shoes under the Poulsen Skone name, although they weren't the same shoes as those previously offered at N&L. N&L changed the brand of its more expensive shoes to "St James Collection." Dunhill's dalliance with Poulsen Skone gradually...
Quote: Originally Posted by sartort pretty sure that New & Lingwood's version is the same shoe, just different (plain) detailing. I haven't been on the N&L site for a long time and was surprised to see that they've revived the Poulsen Skone brand name. My recollection is that this line at N&L used to be referred to as their "St. James" range. Nonetheless, they're Grenson MPs as before and similarly outlandishly-priced. Jeez, close to $800 plus...
Here's my latest: http://cgi.ebay.com/Citizen-THE-CITI...ayphotohosting This watch (not purchased on eBay) nicely addresses two important values for me: precision and beauty. It's the Citizen Chronomaster (formerly called "The Citizen"). It's movement, the Citizen A660, is the most accurate watch movement available today; its specs are +/- 5 seconds a year. This puts it into the genre of High-End Quartz, a small grouping of thermocompensated quartz watches that...
Not having ever owned a Kiton shirt, I'm not sure about whether they use the typically-Neapolitan very thick buttons found on Borrelli, Barba, Truzzi, etc., shirts. However, they will certainly be nicely-made mother of pearl items. These are available from a number of sources. You just need to measure the diameter of the buttons, very likely 16 ligne (.40 in.) or 18 ligne (.45 in.), for shirt fronts, and possibly 14 ligne (.35) for gauntlet buttons and perhaps cuff...
Quote: Originally Posted by Bob Loblaw At last we have been freed from the tyranny of the rules. In my opinion, the so-called "rules" have never been tyrannical, but rather just guidelines that provided some degree of comfort and self-confidence to men wanting to avoid dressing in ways that would be seen by others as inappropriate. I really doubt that many men said to themselves, "Damn, I'd like to wear this lavender shirt, but those...
To both of you guys--and anyone else: What are your thoughts about what will replace the suit as we know it today? I don't have the knowledge and perspective to predict long-term paradigm shifts like this, but don't see at the moment anything seriously competing with the suit (or odd jacket/trousers, as JLibourel has added). What we are seeing are tiny refinements or superficial changes made to the suit form, but nothing really different has emerged. The trends we're...
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