or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:

Posts by MoneyWellSpent

Thanks for the feedback!
So what is considered an "acceptable" filler for leather? I can't find it now, but I think Nick mentioned filling in a screw hole if it became necessary. Is there a special product for this?
Good question. Kinda hard to tell.You can see better in this one, and it does look rather plastic like...[URL]http://Paul Smith X John Lobb Special Edition Shoes - YouTube[/URL]
Yes, this makes sense, and honestly wasn't lost on me. I should have worded my reply differently. The real issue is that the "cork" paste that is spread under the insole in GY-welted shoes is only partially cork. The material spreads to the areas of least compression during wear in order to arrive at the "footbed" in a GY shoe.My response to Chogall wasn't to go into the compression characteristics of cork, so much as to drive the point that the amount of material put...
Neither of these assumptions was made. I know the last isn't flat, but that isn't resulting in what is portrayed in the video.Obviously cork can be compressed, that's the point, and that is how the GY-welted footbed forms. But, it can't compress to the extent you see in the video.
I'll go a step further on that mention of the cork on John Lobb's GY-welted shoes, and say that I've questioned it in the past wondering if it is even an accurate depiction of real-life.  For the most part, I don't question what is shown in the videos/pictures, as I believe that they are accurate representations of daily factory processes.  For the most part, I don't think they are doing anything for the video strictly for demonstration purposes, which isn't...
I'm not misunderstanding a thing, and I've seen evidence of only one GY-welted shoe that they piled the cork higher than the inseam, which was John Lobb. All others make it flush, using the heated cork "paste" that is spread around like peanut butter using a flat scraping tool until it is flush with the inseam, and ready for outsole stitching.I'm happy to keep discussing reasonable things, but clearly you are out of your depth here and don't know what you are talking...
Chogall, the main hole in your theory is a misunderstanding of the construction of the shoe. If the screw punctures through the outsole, it can hit the inseam. That doesn't guarantee that it will hit the thread, but the inseam system can be effected, nonetheless. Everything is brought up to level (flush) on the bottom before the outsole is stitched on. Thus, the cork (or felt), is in the void between the ribs, holdfast, or channel of the inseam. They are made thick...
I'm really not trying to imply much. Just observing is all.That said, while they are certainly different, wood is a fibrous material.But, regardless of the differences in physical make up, leather fibers are not going to behave as you postulate, by "twisting more fibers" around the screw. The screw will destroy the leather if a screw is over tightenened. The leather doesn't suddenly behave like octopus tentacles.
Speaking of screws damaging the shoe (potentially), I'd refer everyone back to that St. Crispin's "The Complete Process" video on youtube, for an interesting observation.Watch when the metal toe plate is installed... they use an electric screwdriver, and the guy keeps drilling for multiple rotations after the screw is flush. Now, I've never done this on a pair of shoes, but I have screwed in my share of screws in soft materials such as drywall or certain woods. I know...
New Posts  All Forums: