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Posts by MoneyWellSpent

 I may have missed it, but I didn't see anyone respond to your post.  The answer is yes, be concerned.  You are seeing the inseam stitching, which essentially means that the shoe is coming apart at the foundation.  The inseam is the stitching that holds the welt, upper and insole together as a cohesive unit.  If you continue to wear them, they will begin to distort, because they are flexing in the zone that they are coming loose in.  The leather will be able to move freely...
 It just looks like a lasted, hand-welted shoe that's ready for welting.  The upper of the shoe has been lasted, and is being held in place by tacks which are hammered into the bottom of the last through the upper and insole.  It's now ready for the welt to be sewn on, which will hold the upper in place to the holdfast on the bottom of the insole.  The tacks will be removed as the welt is sewn on.
 The additional 20% off was only for yesterday.  Sorry.   They are still marked down to $258.00 which is a great price for 1st quality staple AE's.
Anyone looking for the basic staple shoes may want to check out Jos A Bank today.  Their AE's are marked down to $258.00, with an additional 20% off a purchase of $100.00 or more.  That brings them down to $207.00 for first quality AE's.  You will still have to pay shipping, but it's a great way to get 1st quality staple shoes for the price of a pair of seconds.   For those that don't know, the Boardroom is Jos A Bank's exclusive version of the Park Avenue.  The...
   RTP is correct.  A Goodyear-welted shoe can only take a finite number of re-weltings.  It's a bit deceitful when people tout GY-welted shoes as being able to last a lifetime as long as you maintain the uppers and have them resoled.  This is more true if you leave the welt in place and simply replace the sole.  A welt can theoretically withstand several resolings before it has to be replaced (assuming your wear pattern doesn't chew into the toe as some do).  However, in...
 @bkotsko I think you answered the inquiry correctly.  Thanks for the nod!
 You are fully correct that some people have different thresholds for the durability : comfort ratio.  Nothing wrong with that.  I'm also not trying to say that I won't ever purchase a model with a Poron insole.  Rather, what I'm saying is that if the traditional leather insole is an option, I'll always pick it.  I own the Long Branch as well, and purchased it for similar reasons.  I wanted a boot that I wasn't as concerned about taking some abuse, and none of the...
 At the risk of being misunderstood, that's what I was hinting at in a light-hearted way.
 Just don't let the sales person catch you picking at the insole.    It's glued in, and isn't really "intended" to be removed.  It's easy to pull out with a small amount of force without damaging it, but in the store hey may not take well to someone pulling apart one of their most expensive shoes on the rack. 
 The fact they AE won't replace the insole actually increases the significance of the issue.  Poron is a high tech foam, as foams go.  But, it's still foam.  Foam breaks down over time, and generally much more quickly than leather (if the leather is properly cared for).  If you are comfortable with the solid leather insole, then always opt for it.  There are people who need more cushion for medical reasons, and I won't disparage the presence of foam insoles because of...
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