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Posts by MoneyWellSpent

Absolutely. Theoretical knowledge and practical knowledge are not equal. Knowing how something is done doesn't necessarily mean you can do it. I don't presume to make people believe I can make them a pair of shoes. Although I do intend to learn... hopefully in the not too distant future.
The stitches you see when you look inside the shoe are holding on the midsole. You can't see those from outside the shoe. The stitches you see on the bottom of the shoe (if there are any), are the same stitches you see around the perimeter of the top of the sole. If you don't see stitches on the bottom of the shoe, then that means they have cemented on a rubber outsole. Take a closer look at the last photo I posted. You can see both stitches fairly well,where they...
 Yeah, the internet is covered with photos of hand-welted shoes being made, which essentially is the opposite of dissection, but all the steps and components are photo documented nonetheless.  Factory methods, however, are more mysterious and opening the black box is very interesting to me.
 Thanks for your thoughts!  It is definitely a true leather insole.  Allen Edmonds doesn't use sock liners on their standard line of shoes.  In fact, it's the pair I had posted photos of before, with the insole extracted.  This was pre-dissection.  After ripping it apart, the glue was able to be peeled away from the edges of the insole, and it wasn't visible underneath the shoe when I took off the outsole and removed the cork.  It was on the sides and surface of the...
 Thanks for posting.  So it looks like Rancourt puts a foam cushioned sock-liner in place for the heel to rest on.  But, as in the photos I posted, the ball of your foot will be resting on the thin leather wrapped fiberboard, which is butted up against the harder midsole and outsole.  So I wouldn't expect much forming to take place there.
 No, there isn't any cork.  They layers are all in such close proximity that no substantial filler is required.  In some Blake/Rapid shoes, some foam will be used when necessary underneath the insole, but I don't believe Rancourt uses any.  Here are some photos of some Blake/Rapid cross-sections, which help illustrate:  As you said, there are many who find Goodyear to be more comfortable due to imprint left when the cork displaces underneath the insole during wear.  In a...
Here is something interesting...   I can't say that I've seen this with the Northampton manufacturers, but it seems that the two major American GY-welted makers feel the need to further reinforce their gemming above and beyond the adhesive on the gemming itself.    When looking inside an Allen Edmonds shoe, it is the norm to see the added cement around the perimeter of the insole, as seen in this photo (click to enlarge):     Interestingly, I've only ever seen it...
Rancourt refers to their Blake/rapid constructed models as "Blake welt stitched." I think it is a bit misleading in that there is no welt. However, they attach the final outsole with a Rapid-E outsole stitcher, same as Goodyear-welted shoes, which is where the "rapid" part of the name comes from. I think Rancourt just coined the alternate term since machines traditionally used in welted shoes are being employed to finish the shoe.The upper is wrapped under the insole,...
Those sorta remind me of the soles used for Gucci bit loafers. In this video, you can see starting around the 39 second mark, where the soles are made independent of the upper, and resembles a bowl. They then lay the completed upper into it and Blake stitch them together.https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=cEQg5ZKNVJkThe edge of the sole has some detail in the video, which I assume is just some sort of bonwelt.
I have the most recent edition of Roetzel's book, and that is still in there. He says that they keep the old method as a "fall back" if necessary. I don't know what that is supposed to mean. Perhaps they run out of gemming sometimes, or if the gemming application machine breaks down, then they can keep making shoes.
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