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Posts by MoneyWellSpent

 
 Ah, thanks for the details!  Somehow that one's escaped me.  I'm sorry there isn't a show about shoes...
 Oh, the leather sole absolutely contributes to the stiffness.  Really, it's the entire construction method that results in a much stiffer shoe than a regular cemented shoe, as a cemented shoe with a leather sole is still far more flexible than a Goodyear-welted shoe.  Texon can get pretty thin, and it's hard to see from the photos if that's what we are looking at, but what I'm seeing only further deters me from the Poron insole models. 
 The Poron should be mounted to a thin piece of Texon or fiberboard.  Are you sure you weren't seeing that instead of cork?  Foam (Poron) by itself isn't strong enough to withstand the forces that the shoe is subjected do during the assembly process, and without a hard backing, they would flex more like a cemented shoe (which they don't).
     Great timing... I was about to apologize for this post being about a week late, but here are photos from an old pair of AE Hinsdales I dissected recently.  The toe stiffener could probably stand to be stouter, but it is certainly there as I figured it was.  There is too much spring in the leather for there not to be one.  Also included are a couple of photos of the heel counter which is a slightly stouter piece of material (plastic).  Celastic has fallen out of favor...
 I don't get offended at that.  I don't know everything, and I'm not a shoemaker.  I just pass on what I learn from what I consider to be reputable sources since I enjoy learning about the intricacies of shoe history and construction.
 Frankly, in most cases, I don't think AE does wheeling well.  I'd be hesitant to order an MTO with it out of concern for this.  As far as Goodyear-welted shoe manufacturers go, Alden is one of the better at wheeling, IMO.  In fact, more often than not, Alden's stitches line up with the wheeling the way it is intended to.  Many of the better English GY-welted shoes only add light wheeling decoration to the edge of the welt where it doesn't even touch the stitches, perhaps...
 I can't address that, to be honest.  Frankly, their description doesn't make any sense to me.  All I can tell you is the known history of fudging/wheeling which is what I said.  It isn't unusual for some shoe manufacturers to be liberal with their use of terminology.  There are plenty of other examples out there of companies calling something a name that doesn't match with it's historical definition.
     Sorry I'm late to the party, but just saw this discussion.  Yes, wheeling and fudging are the same thing as they are done with a fudge wheel.  To fill out the article from Permanent Style a bit more...  The technique used to be performed (and still is by a select few) with a tool called a Stitch Prick. It is a sort of hooked blade which cuts a small notch in the leather and is used to create the ridges which serve to pre-mark the welt for stitching, as well as tighten...
 bkotsko, you have correctly defined the difference, and yes, the heel seat is nailed before the heel stack in 270 degree welted models.    I think Alpina was just trying to say that 270/360 welting isn't dependent upon the type of welt used.  In other words, you can have a 270 degree welted shoe with a flat, storm, split-reverse, etc., welt.  You can have a 360 degree welted shoe with any of these as well.  Certainly, the stitching goes through the welt when attaching the...
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