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Posts by MoneyWellSpent

Well, you are certainly talented to say the least!
@duncanbootmaker Thanks for those posts! I really enjoyed reading them. Are the illustrations from one of your books, or are those pencil drawings of yours?
It could effect their longevity in theory, and DW gave his advice on the best way to minimize the risk.That said, they appear to be standard dress shoes, which I assume will be worn in a fairly standard dress shoe context (concrete/carpet jungle), in which case I doubt this will lead to issues with longevity in my opinion.If you were exposing them to high degrees of dirt, dust, mud, moisture, etc., then you'd have far more reason to be concerned. Wearing them to the...
3 Trad Patterns...
I fully appreciate everything you just said, and would really enjoy the photo of the Nick's boot cut in half. Just one question regarding the firefighting... White's, Nick's, etc., don't have any gemming , so I assume you are referring to some fire fighters wearing standard Goodyear-welted boots in the same environment? Many Goodyear-welted work boots also have steel shanks, which are inappropriate for fire fighting due to the way they heat up and transmit heat to the...
Admittedly, I wish I knew their construction method better. We had a discussion about this in the Nick's Boots thread a couple of years ago beginning at post #75 here: http://www.styleforum.net/t/378424/nicks-boots/60I'd recommend reading through that.They are a small subset of methods used amongst these makers, and it's a bit hard to fully understand, although there are a few videos that help too. Wesco has a decent video on their website, and if you Google for videos...
I do think it would be usefully for Viberg to provide greater detail on their precise method for their Goodyear-welted products. From the photos I've seen, they appear to be using the old cut/turned method with no reinforcement from canvas. Unless they simply don't show the canvas step in the photos. Again, they also seem to be using a very robust insole, which I would trust for hunting, wet environment, work boot activities far more than other contemporary...
I would like to add a bit more to this discussion. There are a handful of ways to create the insole rib that is used for stitching to the welt in Goodyear-welting. Probably the least secure is the prevailing method used by the majority of shoemakers, including the upper ended ones such as John Lobb, Gaziano Girling, and Edward Green, all the way down to Alden, Allen Edmonds, etc. This method is simply adhering a canvas ribbon with a fiber core to the bottom of the...
I'm afraid that this isn't quite correct. When Goodyear-welting was invented, it initially used a cut and turned leather "feather" the way Viberg is. However, that proved to become brittle over time, and prone to breaking, which jeopardizes the integrity of the inseam. To ameliorate the issue, they began gluing in canvas to reinforce the leather, which was the initial purpose of "gemming." However, that method was replaced somewhere around the Second World War due to...
The only issue with that analogy being that Goodyear is neither better looking (subjective I know) nor is more robust than SD, so there really isn't much reason to choose it in this case. In other words, it isn't a "healthier" choice.All this talk resurfacing begs the question though. Did I miss something about Viberg's business model recently? They aren't discontinuing SD are they? Still intending to do both as they initially said back when they introduced...
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