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Posts by CrimsonSox

When you're in public, in a subway or walking down the street, have you ever seen someone take your picture without your permission?  Seems rather odd and intrusive.  I was with my wife on the T in Boston tonight when a woman pointed her iPhone in our direction.  I imagine that forum members who dress more formally may sometimes face this situation.  What do you do?   
Great thread and entries.  Some inspiration for this week, featuring Robert Redford: http://www.styleforum.net/t/359471/navy-on-navy-prime-minister-cameron/30#post_6657760
B and D by far.  The trouble with A and C is that they're distracting.  The eye focuses on the small deviations from the pattern being perfectly straight up and down, especially on the edge of the tie. 
Not Scholte or the Duke of Windsor, but it's a fun picture of a royal, Prince Philip, with Gwyneth Paltrow and Cameron Diaz:  
I would agree that a white shirt would be too urban and formal, and too stark a contrast to wear with country tweeds.  But the warm earth tones of cream, light beige, or tattersall check can look quite good, as tdude mentioned.  See these Esquire November 1934 images, posted recently on the London Lounge:       Here's Prince Charles wearing a tweed jacket with a cream colored shirt in 1979.  The beard would fit well at Pitti Uomo:  
The softly rolled lapel.  The Duke's jackets had a gentler waist suppression than you might expect from jackets today.  The elegance of the jacket comes less from a suppressed waist, and more from a beautiful shoulder.  It's neither too sloped nor too straight; it's smooth and well-made; and it's precisely proportioned in width to his head.  Compare Mr. Disney's suit shoulder, which is artificially straight and too wide, or the King of Jordan's shoulder, which is cut too...
Holy sh*t you will not believe who I saw at Pitti Uomo.    
Interesting observation from Colin Heywood of Anderson and Sheppard: their trousers traditionally averaged 21 inches (10.5 inches measured on one side) at the knee, and 18 inches (9 inches measured on one side) at the leg opening: http://www.savilerow-style.com/issue018/style04.htm  A friend who's had clothes made at Henry Poole also had trousers with those measurements.     However, Heywood notes that a 20 inch (10 inch on one side) knee with a 17 inch (8.5 inch on one...
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