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Posts by CrimsonSox

A cherished blog, Heavy Tweed Jacket, that I've followed for years has just closed: http://heavytweed.blogspot.com/ (Derek has the announcement here: http://putthison.com/)  I've always appreciated and enjoyed the vintage Brooks Brothers and LL Bean catalogs he posted, as well as the oxford cloth button-down shirt reviews.  Here's to hoping for our friend to return soon.
Today's theme is the young Prince of Wales, keeping in mind that Scholte was his tailor starting in 1919.   The collar of the jacket fits well, hugging the neck.             I remember Vox once quoting Luciano Barbera, who said he knew he could be friends with you, if you could play golf in a jacket:     Gorgeous overcoat, though the Duke (then the Prince) did not use Scholte for his overcoats, to the best of my knowledge.  Note the rounded...
This thread is to post historical review of firms and guides to style (1960s and older).  We'll start with a guide to Paris firms from Vogue, July 15, 1931.  Some fascinating finds: robes and handkerchiefs made of "sheer linen printed in the designs and colours of foulards."  We'll also discover that in the 1930s, cologne could smell like a "mixture of tobacco and Russian leather."   A preview of coming attractions: next week we will have a review of Charvet from a...
I forgot to include this photo from the Duke's and Duchess' wedding.  The best man is Fruity Metcalfe, the Duke's friend and equerry, who was also a client of Scholte's.  
The windowpane suit.  I love looking at that suit shoulder.  It's the picture of moderation: neither too straight nor too sloped; neither too wide nor too narrow.  Richard Anderson once wrote that Scholte had the reputation of making the best shoulder on the Row in the early to mid 20th century.     Black tie with turn-down spread collar and white pocket square.  Note the similarity in the shoulder:     If I ever include a photo that's already been posted by a...
Brooks Brothers gloves, 1936, from Horace Sleep's (the firm mentioned in the Vogue 1927 London shopping guide).     In 1986, Brooks had dinner jackets made of dacron/wool.  In 1936, dinner jackets were made of vicuna, and suits in English flannels, cheviots, shetlands, saxonies, and Harris Tweeds.      
This is a shopping guide to London from Vogue, May 15, 1927. Our man Scholte makes an appearance in the article, as well as other famous firms, such as Anderson & Sheppard and Davies.  A fascinating detail is that four shoemakers are mentioned as the best in London at the time: Lobb, Peal, Thomas, and McAfee.  I believe that the only surviving bespoke firm is Lobb.  An earlier London shopping guide by Helen Josephy and Mary Margaret McBride, London is a Man's...
Menjou at Anderson and Sheppard:  With the Duke of Windsor's equerry, Fruity Metcalfe (who was the best man at the Duke's wedding):  An unusual fitting with Hawes & Curtis:  
A review of London and Paris firms, including from Savile Row, in The New Yorker, 1929. The writer is a bit conservative, referring to the fashionable nature of Scholte's cut. Some of the advice on ordering suits, however, might be of current interest.   Notably, a firm's quality in 1929 was quite distinct from its quality today. T.M. Lewin, now a mass-market store, back in the '20s made the vanished luxury of "evening shirts with starched bosoms and cuffs, and bodies of...
Some of the items from the Fairbanks estate had inflated prices, but others were not dissimilar to Ebay.  This DB wool coat from H. Huntsman was sold for $688:       A great coat and pea coat from Stovel & Mason, together $469:     Lesley and Roberts blazer (also with an extended front dart), for $115.  
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