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Posts by CrimsonSox

 I see it more as "elegant Yakuza assassin."
It would be interesting to see a picture of your tailcoat if you have the opportunity Poorsod.  I love Edwin DeBoise's work at Steed.  And it's the rare elegant gentleman who owns a tailcoat!
It's very rare to find descriptions and reviews of Scholte's tailoring from the time he was active.  The following article from the New York Herald Tribune, October 20, 1934, compares a Scholte tailcoat and dinner jacket on the left with a more conservative tailor on the right. The Scholte models have wider shoulders and trimmer waists in the jackets, as well as deeper pleats in the trousers.  I've included the accompanying text on the...
A survey of spring fashions for men from Vogue April 16, 1908.  The review includes a lavender striped shirt from Sulka and an extraordinary tailored waistcoat for white tie from Kaskel & Kaskel, a top New York shirtmaker at the time that made shirts for President Theodore Roosevelt. Readers with a historical interesting in style will note that the midnight blue tailcoat and dinner jacket, traditionally attributed to the Duke of Windsor, are already mentioned as fashions...
 I think the Vogue author would take answer 1), as would I.  A bright red pocket square would stand out too much, instead of "blending in with the general color scheme," unless one is wearing a Santa suit. The guideline of not overdoing or piling on embellishments is one condition of dressing well, but not the only condition.  The clothes also have to fit and be coherent on the city/country spectrum (a problem with the bright red pocket square with formal black tie)....
There are people who sell clothes who are well dressed, like JefferyD.  I think what Dopey is saying is not to dress in a way that is over elaborate, the equivalent of oversaucing and overspicing a dish.  It's fine to wear a pocket square, colorful socks, an unusual shade of shoes, a richly patterned suit, and a tie bar, but not all at the same time.  The idea is not to get rid of spice but to be balanced in using it.  Spice is nice but not as a main dish.   Vogue had a...
In the 1930s, Sulka New York offered a laundry service for its clients, washing its shirts in olive-oil soap, hand ironing, and mending any frayed collars or loose buttons.  The price was 10 cents ($4.80 in today's dollars).  The service was so popular that the average client had washed eleven shirts, five pajamas, and assorted socks and handkerchiefs each week, adding up to $10 ($160 in today's dollars).  Another laundry service offered to wash your white suit in the...
A 1928 review of New York shirt-makers (with an appearance by D&J Anderson) from the New Yorker.  It's extraordinary to think that Charvet once had an outpost in New York, which was founded by the nephew of Edouard Charvet (www.leagle.com/get_cited/568%20F.Supp.%20470).  It's unclear, however, what the relation of Budd of New York was to Budd of Piccadilly. Budd (NY) was founded by Samuel Budd in 1860, while Budd (London) was founded by Harold Budd in 1910.   I've included...
A review of London tailors and shirtmakers, and advice for the bespoke customer, from the New Yorker, 1930. Tailoring firms in that era had much larger staffs, making possible astonishingly quick turnaround times: only three weeks for bespoke shoes and two weeks for your first suit with a tailor, including four fittings. Then there's a fifth fitting after you've worn the suit for a week for final adjustments.   Scholte appears, though misspelled as his name often is...
Vogue visits Charvet in February 1914, on the eve of World War 1.  The article features a tailcoat from Charvet, watered silk wallets, and rhinoceros horn canes.      This is just an excerpt; the rest of the article describes dressing in Europe.  Although the historically minded clothing enthusiast will be aware of this, it's still remarkable to read about the dominance of the English at the time: “The universal acceptance of English fashion by king and commoner alike has...
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