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Posts by CrimsonSox

You remember back in college, when people would call athletes "meat heads"?  Or how they would refer to someone who was brilliant as a "nerd"?  I always thought it was silly, but it illustrates something about human nature.  It's very hard for most people to acknowledge when someone is better looking than they are or smarter, without taking them down in some way.  "Yeah, he's intelligent, but does he have a social life?"  What's unbearable for most people (save for those...
Epic post and highly informative.  Thank you Dirnelli, Paul, Hugo, Sonya, Bruce, Benoit, and Ville for the excellent reviews, and for all of the hard work and thought that went into them.
 Love the DB Agnelli is wearing in the 1st picture.  The 2nd picture is a great comparison between the skinny tie trend of the 60s w/ the more traditional medium width tie (my preference).
 I see it more as "elegant Yakuza assassin."
It would be interesting to see a picture of your tailcoat if you have the opportunity Poorsod.  I love Edwin DeBoise's work at Steed.  And it's the rare elegant gentleman who owns a tailcoat!
It's very rare to find descriptions and reviews of Scholte's tailoring from the time he was active.  The following article from the New York Herald Tribune, October 20, 1934, compares a Scholte tailcoat and dinner jacket on the left with a more conservative tailor on the right. The Scholte models have wider shoulders and trimmer waists in the jackets, as well as deeper pleats in the trousers.  I've included the accompanying text on the...
A survey of spring fashions for men from Vogue April 16, 1908.  The review includes a lavender striped shirt from Sulka and an extraordinary tailored waistcoat for white tie from Kaskel & Kaskel, a top New York shirtmaker at the time that made shirts for President Theodore Roosevelt. Readers with a historical interesting in style will note that the midnight blue tailcoat and dinner jacket, traditionally attributed to the Duke of Windsor, are already mentioned as fashions...
 I think the Vogue author would take answer 1), as would I.  A bright red pocket square would stand out too much, instead of "blending in with the general color scheme," unless one is wearing a Santa suit. The guideline of not overdoing or piling on embellishments is one condition of dressing well, but not the only condition.  The clothes also have to fit and be coherent on the city/country spectrum (a problem with the bright red pocket square with formal black tie)....
There are people who sell clothes who are well dressed, like JefferyD.  I think what Dopey is saying is not to dress in a way that is over elaborate, the equivalent of oversaucing and overspicing a dish.  It's fine to wear a pocket square, colorful socks, an unusual shade of shoes, a richly patterned suit, and a tie bar, but not all at the same time.  The idea is not to get rid of spice but to be balanced in using it.  Spice is nice but not as a main dish.   Vogue had a...
In the 1930s, Sulka New York offered a laundry service for its clients, washing its shirts in olive-oil soap, hand ironing, and mending any frayed collars or loose buttons.  The price was 10 cents ($4.80 in today's dollars).  The service was so popular that the average client had washed eleven shirts, five pajamas, and assorted socks and handkerchiefs each week, adding up to $10 ($160 in today's dollars).  Another laundry service offered to wash your white suit in the...
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