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Posts by Sandyman

Thank you for you kind words, FlyingMonkey!   You illustrate admirably how when the cage is rattled, the monkey gibbers!   Have a banana as your reward!
Shirtmaven, you are a delight!   First you draw on ethnic sterotypes to support your challenge, now you are being hightist!  If I am a frigtening, deformed dwarf, it is a sad accident of birth, but you are clearly a self-made man!  We are talking intelect here... and I know I will always be a giant in your eyes!  Be careful what bridge you go trip-trapping over!   As for photos of how the pattern was laid out, I seem to have been remiss.  You should have said at...
O, Shirtmaven, wherefore art thou..?   Where now thy pithy retort?   Your argument intrigues me.  I cannot follow the reasoning that your friend, Mickey Black, being a jewish Scotsman from Edinburgh somehow is the benchmark by which other tailors are measured - or are you drawing on ethnic stereotypes for support.  Curiously enough, I too, happen have a similar blood-mix to your friend, only my parentage has added a quantity of Swiss to the mix also.   Odd...
Stugotes is only partially correct.   The attitude to crafts and skills in the Far East makes them much more enterprising and more accommodating to the customer.  There seems to be a much greater acceptance of if it can be done, it will be done.   As regards tailoring quality, there is some compromising to be sure, but the result is generally as good as the average occidental made-to-measure garment, and superior to most of the mass-produced,...
Crat -   It is almost impossible to define "classic" exactly, as the concept alters with each generation, it seems.  But a jacket cut slightly longer than the off-the-peg standard length jacket is usually thought to be more pleasing, and some Savile Row businesses make a point of noting this as their house-style.  A longer jacket allows for a more flattering cut, with the impression of more athletic, slender hip area - or that's the idea.   But each to his own,...
Perhaps Shirtmaven and Despos need to open their minds a little!   It is disppointing that what should be words of encouragement are taken for boasting, for that is far from my intention.  But when misinformed claims are made openly, such as with the kilt, it is the duty of those who know the facts to provide the necessry enlightenment.  Myth and bewilderment is the alternative.   Judging from the responses, it seems I have hitherto underestimated the skill and...
In response to Crat's request, I should say that both the blue and the grey suits seem well made, but the cut looks too short in the jacket, but in keeping with the current fashions.   For the classic, timeless look, the rule of thumb is just that.  Allow the arms to relax and rest at the sides, then turn the thumb in toward the leg.  Where the tip of the thumb touches the leg is the length the jacket should be.  This length both covers the seat area, and allows the...
Shirtmaven doubts me?   He is welcome to come and see the suit, and the cloth purchase receipt for confirmation.  And the name of the tailor is no secret - they have a shop on the Otley Road, Horsforth, Yorkshire, England.   Yorkshire is full of wool merchants and cloth wholesalers, and Scotland is full of weavers ready to sell their produce at a competative price.  Careful choice in both sourcing the material and finding a tailor can easily return a bespoke suit...
Tartan was originally woven in 27inch widths (long before the French Revolutionaries had come with the metric system), and some spcialist tartans are still produced on the old hand-looms.  The Highland regiments originally supplied the men with lengths that varied according different factors, and was measured in "ells" - a standard public-use ell is still in place in Dunkeld market-place (an ell is about 45inches), where such cloth was sold until fairly recent times. ...
2.2 metres of fabric should be enough to get a two-piece suit mde up.   I bought an end-of-roll remnant of the same length, of an all-wool herring-bone tweed with a four-inch repeat over-check, with the intention of having it made up unto a jacket.  The Yorkshire-based bespoke tailor (who did the bespoke work for a well-known London West End outfitters) I used advised that the length of material was sufficient for a suit as long as turn-up cuffs were not required on...
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