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Posts by thebeatblitz

9E Soho cognac and black.
Using a benzo for public speaking seems like a terrible idea since it's a CNS depressant. Propranolol has an indicated use for temporary anxiety-induced tachycardia and will get rid of the majority of your anxiety-related symptoms. Tachycardia, sweating, tremors, they'll all decrease without the ridiculous side effect profile of benzo use. The benzo family isn't really a long-term "anxiety" medication. It's primarily used acutely for surgery, panic attacks, as a...
Quote: Originally Posted by Milhouse Average refers to the mean. It is a statistics word. Physician refers to a person that holds an MD. Reading an ECG means interpreting the electrocardiogram. You see, we can design something called an experiment. We know we have a population of physicians that read ECGs as a major responsibility. We can sample those physicians' interpretations of ECGs. We can compare those interpretations to samples of how a...
What do you mean? There is no such thing as an "average physician" reading an ECG. There are tons of physicians in all sorts of specialties. People that are trained to read ECGs read ECGs. The pulmonologist is not going to come in an read an ECG when someone suspects PE because he feels like it. To be specific: The average cardiologist will probably read just as well as a machine in an uncomplicated situation. In complicated situations, I would trust the average...
The "average" physician isn't going to be reading the ECG of a complicated CV patient. If someone comes into the ED with chest pain and has an abnormal ECG, Cards will be consulted. Machine reads are already used in emergent situations; most new AEDs will only shock if a treatable rhythm is detected. There is a ton of money being poured into developing better automated this-and-that, but it's all relatively meaningless unless you have a proper history and exam to...
Quote: Originally Posted by kwiteaboy Interesting - thanks for sharing that. Anyone constantly reading them (EM, IM, Cards, CT, Gas) is probably pretty good. It takes lots of practice to get good at it, and most other specialties are only peripherally exposed to ECGs aside from PGY1.
Most of the convenience stores or fast food restaurants that I frequent have the paypass RFID setup, which is significantly faster than waiting for change from cash and without the hassle of coins. I put almost everything on my 3% cashback card (that sadly isn't 3% anymore I believe). Where are all of you getting the notion that cards are much slower than cash? I also usually carry $100 for tipping or if I get mugged.
I hope you realize Duke and UNC are very competitive medical schools (I did my undergrad at Duke). You'll probably need a 35+ MCAT and a 3.7+ BCPM GPA to even get an interview at Duke, but since you're in-state UNC should be easier. First, you need to figure out how competitive you are and go from there. Do you have a 3.8+ ugrad GPA? Can you score 35+ on the MCAT? If yes, then go to an extremely selective postbacc program like Bryn Mawr, Goucher, or a step down like...
Winged scapula is a bit different from what Rambo is talking about. You had textbook long thoracic n. damage, which innervates the serratus anterior m. and stabilizes the scapula. "Snapping Syndrome" is usually a result of bursitis or a muscle imbalance like why mentioned. If I remember correctly, all you do is PT + NSAID to strengthen the scapular stabilizers. If that fails, corticosteroids or surgery depending on the cause of the snapping.
Quote: Originally Posted by Manton I know this is terribly unfair, but I always thought of a pharmacist as someone who looks at a piece of paper, goes back to a shelf and gets what's written on the paper ... and that's basically it. What do they actually do? They aren't mixing drugs back there anymore, right? Granted, reading doctors' handwriting is a skill in itself. In a retail outlet, the pharm techs will do most of the scutwork; the...
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