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Posts by dbhdnhdbh

If it is largely due to grit, then gently removing it should cut the risk. Still puzzled why cracking seems so rare in things like gloves, some of which live fairly hard lives. DW, from your experience with working cowboy boots, did you see a difference in longevity based on how carefully a client maintained his footwear?
DW, Are wallets made from thinner, softer, more flexible leather than shoes? Come to think of it, what about gloves? I have some gloves and mitts that are decades old, treated with Snoseal to protect from water, and no cracking. Never polished or stripped, of course. How does leather in other applications hold up? Bookbindings live their lives indoors, no exposure to the elements, indoor dust, gentle handling, etc. But eventually they crack. Could much of the difference...
Not exactly the same question, but museum conservators have studied leather treatments for years. Their goals are to preserve leather but not to maintain flexibility, since the specimens sit in cases but are not used. In one famous study, leather samples were treated with a variety of conditioners or nothing and regularly tested for 34 years. There were a lot of findings-it was a scientific study- but they found little evidence that the treatments did anything at all to...
My point about the volatile solvents extracting fats from leather was to contrast this with fats leaving the leather all by themselves. If you treat the leather with such solvents, then you should be able to remove some of the fats. If you do not treat them with such chemicals, then it could be very difficult for any substantial amount of fat bound to the leather to leave.   Leather becoming dry and deteriorating over time need not be a result of fat spontaneously...
I have a lot of problems with this discussion of the fat in leather "evaporating" or being carried away by the evaporation of a solvent. It just does not work that way. In modern fat liquoring, the fats are chemically bound to the leather fibers. They do not go anywhere. Even if they were not bound to the leather, whether they would evaporate would depend on their chemical properties. Not everything evaporates, and these fats do not.   The fats are mixed with water in an...
Renovateur is expensive. VSC is cheap. Nick Horween recommended both. VSC will soak in to the leather, I don't know how far, if you get the shoe up to body temperature with a blow drier. I suffered through the Reno wars but it was never clear that Reno was ruining shoes. It seemed more likely it was using a lot of products, some of which may have stripped fats out of the leather.
I suppose it depends on what one means by "waterproof". Standing in water above the ankles for several hours? Walking several blocks in heavy rain? Somewhere in between?   For the former, it is still hard for me to buy that the weak point will be somewhere other than the seams. If it took hours of soaking (both sides exposed, I assume) to get "waterproof" leather wet, that is probably waterproof enough for nearly all purposes. Beyond that, back to rubber.   For the...
If you want waterproof footwear, traditional welted leather is a challenge. It is possible to make leather waterproof. I don't whether one would want dress shoes made of it. The seams will always be a problem. Seamless rubber bottoms work great, but hardly look like leather. Goretex sounds like a great idea, but I have heard complaints that such boots dry slowly and one failure of the membrane ruins the waterproof property.
Limit the number of resoles... Because the pegs wear down? Can they be replaced by a maker? By a cobbler? Making a polishing bone sounds both gross and way too much work. Fine for a bespoke artisan who routinely makes his own tools, but quite a productiin for an amateur. How much better is this than a ready-made spoon? You mentioned water. Is that just for burnishing, or do you wet the leather for polishing as well? For boning uppers, use the bone dry, a little...
DW,   I certainly believe that people have been using bones for tools long before we learned to make things of metal. But you use bone today because?? It is traditional? It is actually better than any performance you could get out of a metal tool?   I remember your explanation of why you prefer a boar's bristle to a steel needle for stitching insoles. Is this a similar case? I tried my first spooning of shell a couple of days ago. It worked far better than I had...
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