or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:

Posts by dbhdnhdbh

As I said, "nothing to lose". Sand down to clean leather, barge cement and topy. If the leather is too worn to hold the topy, then it is certainly too worn to go much farther without it. 
No need to clean the soles with anything. You will need to sand down the surface before applying the barge cement. When you do that, the surface will be clean, as you will have removed the ditty layer of leather. I would not treat the leather with anything else, as it might interfere with the bond with the cement. If your alternatives are a topy or nothing and you are not ready to resole, then sure, use the topy. They are cheap and may extend the life of the boots. Nothing...
Not being a bespoke shoe type, this is pure speculation.   For some people shoes are fashion items and they go in and out of fashion quickly.   For such people, with large collections that are nevertheless constantly culled by removing those pairs that are no longer trendy, the durabilty of the shoes may be of no consequence.   It would be like telling a woman who is obsessed with fashion that this well made dress could be worn 500 times. She would roll her eyes at...
I am not suggesting anyone would actually do this, but based on my vast expertise of having seen a couple of videos of handwelting and GY welting, applying the gemming in a factory happens in the blink of an eye.   Even if slower by hand, it has to be much faster than carving the insole. If the stitching were just as slow as stitching the welt to a HW insole, that would save time, hence money. Perhaps not enough to show up in the price, and perhaps many makers would be...
Once the gemming is applied, there is no reason one could not attach the welt by hand, rather than using a machine. There might even be a point, beyond being able to claim handmade, and it would be possible. Even without the machine it would faster than handwelting, wouldn't it?
I did not mind the sound or the hardness of the V cleat. But wow! were they slippery. I never hit the ground, but I slipped so often and badly on marble floors that I took  mincing little steps till I got home. Did not wear them again until I got the nylon taps.They were fine on sidewalks, but deadly on smooth floors.   I recall reading on here that rubber toplifts, or at least rubber at the back quarters wore more slowly than leather. But both wear too fast for me, so I...
Having had some V cleat Florsheims, which were very slippery before I applied nylon heel taps, I cannot imagine risking my life walking on metal taps. If someone can use them and stay upright, good for them. I suspect people who don't like the look of heel taps might find metal as objectionable as nylon, but I don't know.
Nylon heel taps or black Shoo Goo. Or both. You cannot minimize or elminate heel wear, but you can put something on top of the heel. That tap, goo, or both will wear down instead of the heel. When it wears out, you replace it. Much cheaper than replacing the heel toplift. But some people don't like the way these solutions work. If you are one of those people, then you are largely out of luck. Some on here have suggested that one can use brass nails, relatively closely...
Don't worry about it? It is only visible when the shoes are off and the trees are out.You could try the various cleaners, acetone, Renomat, etc. An ink eraser? But perhaps do more harm than good.
I have done exactly this. Take a piece of leather, cut it to shape and use it as a shoe insert. Works geart. Not sure it has much effect on sweaty feet. I find loose fitting shoes help with that, up to the limit of how loose they can be. Most recently I experimented with getting the leather molded to my feet. I saturated the insert with conditioner until it was wet. Then put it in the shoe and went for a walk. I could feel it squishing down as I walked. Before too long I...
New Posts  All Forums: