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Posts by RIDER

Hats off to Tony & Dean on that one......one hell of a tough make there.
 My point exactly.....I choose neither.As far as 'tea', I'm afraid science disagrees though. This was the landmark study issued by the EPA that was the beginning of the end for many tanneries here in the US.Fast forward to page 26:Further, it would be far too simple to assume that the only process of a tannery that would possibly have an impact on the environment would be the method of tanning - of far more consequence is the method, and materials/waste, associated with...
Well, I'm certainly sorry to hear that....and I think I know who you are referring to.Regarding allergies - sure, I have seen it as well. A few times, and they know what they need to look for. It certainly represents a tiny fraction of the population. I'm allergic to bee stings so I stay away from bees.BLC Leather Technology Center commissioned a study by Ecobilan S.A. (Reference BLC Report 002) to do a life cycle analysis to evaluate the various tanning chemicals, to...
That was an interesting read......saw it long ago so much has changed, for sure, there. Also, just for the record.....Saphir does use, in fact, real Mink Oil. Sourced from Finland. The Creme Universelle uses Jojoba Oil, interestingly enough. Also, you have to be very careful reading older publications regarding products. Manufacturers in this business change formulas at the drop of a hat.
Ehh....it's all a bunch of hippie hand-wringing, if you ask me.But - and I can't find the pdf I grabbed years ago right now - here is a link that apparently references the same study.....a study paid for by an Eco group.http://www.all-about-leather.co.uk/what-is-leather/the-eco-leather-story.htmAs well, and I'm sure you know, most 'veg' leathers sold are really chrome tanned with a veg retan.......true veg tanned will not hold up against the elements without additional...
Not at all.......of the three types of tanning, all have been found to have equal potential of negative environmental impacts. It's all about waste processing and that goes hand-in-hand with regulation.
No worries....and, yes, regular Burgundy will be fine I'm sure.
My guess would be that was done to mark out a second that was sold on the aftermarket so that they can't be returned to a regular store for a full refund.
The model is, simply, 24-8531 and they were made in Sept of 2000. The leather is a corrected grain calf, but a good one - not a split. The finish is multiple layers of rolled on pigment and the scuffs you see are virtually impossible to get away from. This leather always streaked at the heel and toe area a bit, and I can't recall ever having much success fixing it with any product. Just the nature of the shoe. Don't bother with cream for these types of leathers as...
Unfortunately, to answer that question would require a book....almost impossible to answer, in any detail, in a post. However, Ferragamo answered this question in his autobiography probably as well as you can as a primer:Open your hands and place them, right into left, palm to palm. Gently squeeze your left fingers around your right hand. Your thumb should be over the knuckle of your right fore finger and the other 4 fingers around the outside of your right hand. ...
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