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Posts by sehkelly

Yes, you really don't see so much Bedford cord these days.   Its resemblance to cotton cord is really only superficial, because structurally they are very different -- but its corrugated and grooved look and feel makes it a good companion with its cotton namesake on the reversible overshirt.   We plan to keep using it across other garments over the next 12 months.   Paul
On the subject of that which is new, I should point out a few new additions to our workshop.   First is a reversible overshirt, made from cotton corduroy (deadstock, woven about twenty years ago by a mill in Lancashire, in the north-west of England) and a wool known as Bedford cord (woven by a mill in Somerset, down in the south-west).   There's a rust-colour version, and an off-black version, and they're both at http://www.sehkelly.com/shop/jackets/.       I...
Hello   Thank you for the kind words. Two moderately quick answers:   * We will indeed be making more 10-ply jumpers, later this autumn, but the rollneck will not be amongst them. Instead, we have the crewneck again, in a few different four-yarn shades of grey.    (We are also making a 6-ply jumper, and some cardigans, too; all of them super-soft lambswool, and all of them variations on our usual tuck-stitch.)   * Prices on the website include VAT. To talk...
Hmm.We measure thigh in the usual way: trouser laid down flat, measuring from seam to seam, across the thigh.Sounds to me like our proper trousers may be too tight for you.They are a traditional, roomy, cut in the waist and seat, and wide on the leg. After the first two "looks" on http://www.sehkelly.com/worn/, all trousers are the same style as the new moleskin ones.You can also see a few images of the moleskin trousers being worn, face on, standing up, at...
Oh yes. Short and simple answer to this one. These days, we measure sleeve-length in the standard way (down the outside of the arm). Paul
Afternoon all   The last of our shipments to Japan left the factory this week, which is good news for many reasons -- especially because it means what we call the "overlap garments" (garments which we sell in Japan and on our website) are as good as finished.   The first of are calico-cotton shirts, which are made from a natural ecru cotton, and then garment-dyed by some clever colour-masters in the East Midlands. In true time-honoured garment-dyed tradition, the cloth...
What venting. (Sorry.) Speaking of vents, we just added one (and only one) to a new development -- a casual SB2 -- at the factory. We have found that the short and very simple SB1 is good for some people, the more traditional trappings of the SB3 are good for others -- and so what better way to satisfy anyone left out than with an SB2. As well as being the mathematical average of the SB1 and SB3, the SB2 will introduce a few new ideas and motifs we have been working on...
Interesting. Good to know.  I do enjoy eliminating traditional / vestigial aspects on things, but the vent on a jacket had never occurred to me. Especially on shorter jacket (which ours are) I see your point (though this 2" vent thing I don't like the sound of one bit).
Hello We're reaching a stage now where, some of the cloths we have used since we began, we have become fond of, and enjoyed working with, and so intend to revisit every now and then. The heavy "big barley" Donegal tweed you mention is one such cloth. Particularly the tobacco / charcoal version from last year. Hopefully it will come back around again, before too long, and we can put an end to the haunting. The "Tetris" tweed -- which we've used previously for jackets, like...
 Hah. You can have the "heavy tweed" part, by all means -- but the non-vented part, I'm afraid, will not be accommodated this time around. You're not the first to suggest such, however. There's at least one other fellow I have met via Styleforum that is an anti-vent man. What's the thinking there?
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