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Posts by cosmic

What about the entry-level Brit shoemakers? Barker, Cheaney etc do good quality shoes at lower prices than C&J. 
Possibly, but overdressing a bit is never fatal, underdressing can be.    Sport coats are the bedrock of business casual, and you can always take them off once at the office. A gentleman should never be caught without a jacket to hand. 
For business casual I would start with a navy suit sans tie. It looks sharp but not too formal, and it's always better to be dressed a bit smarter than a bit more casual than everyone else in the office. Button down shirt is fine. If you arrive and everyone is in jeans and t-shirts, just leave the top 2 buttons undone, take off your jacket, and roll up your sleeves - you'll look a bit overdressed but not too much.    Then once you've assessed exactly how casual...
Waist-length burgundy leather jacket - what colour/material trousers would go best with it? 
For a first striped suit in a wardrobe, what would you recommend? Navy or charcoal? Pin or chalk stripe? Any other details? Give me some ideas!
Mid-grey, maybe with a bit of pattern or texture e.g. herringbone, sharkskin, flannel. Dark charcoal pin-stripe (subtle stripes, fairly close together) would be another sound choice. Double-breasted could be an interesting option.    If you're in a hot climate or more relaxed dress environment, then tan, light grey, or dark blue linen are worth considering.   I'd stay clear of windowpane - IMO this looks very loud and garish on a full suit, and is rather...
  What if an outfit violates a given rule or rules, but actually looks better or creates a better impression than outfits that conform to the rules? In this case, the rules are not serving their purpose, and are actually inhibiting good dress and style.   In any field, rules only have validity to the extent that they serve purpose and function - to the extent that they impede it, the rules can and should be violated. 
I don't agree fully - that implies that other people's opinion is the driving factor. What you described there is appropriateness, not style. Appropriateness is knowing the done thing. Style is looking good. So, some ghetto pimp might dress totally inappropriately at an upmarket nightclub, but he may still be stylish if his outfit is particularly beautiful and well co-ordinated.    I accept there is a combination of style and appropriateness that, when done together,...
But why did they write those sentences? Because the effect was better than if they slavishly obeyed the rule. They judged things on what is important: the quality of the outcome; not on what was unimportant: the following of a rule for its own sake, or for the sake of conforming.    Following the rules only makes sense if the rules make sense. If the rules say to wear kipper ties and bell-bottom flares, or to wear short tight suit jackets that crumple around the fastened...
I think the evidence is pretty strong that some elements of aesthetics are universal amongst humans. Almost no one finds a lopsided, wart-ridden face to be beautiful, no matter what culture or era they are from. Symmetry in members of the opposite sex is almost universally preferred.   My opinion of Masai style in general will be dependent on a combination of my inherent (biologically/genetically created) aesthetic taste, my cultural programming, and how much I can break...
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