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Posts by Manton

The safest way to enjoy old Champs is to pick up bottles that the producers release or re-release after years in their cellars. Or, sometimes, in cask. Prices aren't always awful, either. By "old" though I mean 20-25 max. I never have Champs older than that. That is truly hard to find, and very pricey.
Me too. Never seems to go bad.
At the "North beach" stand at AT&T, two Italian sausages and two beers was $30.
you dumb wop
Why on earth?!?!
Ruby is basically jug wine. I only cook with it these days. If I want a port, I will shell out the $15 or $20 for a basic NV bottle from a good house.
I believe it has to be in barell a minimum of two years for VP, though they can hold it longer. LBV is bascially VP that for whatever reason they didn't bottle and sell as VP. That sometimes means the quality was off, but not always. Could also mean they just had too much and the market was saturated. It stays in barrel longer so it ages more, and gets bricker. Since it's aged a lot more in barrel, you can drink it quite a bit yonger than VP. Tawney is meant to be...
All of the big houses make a basic bottling that's under $20 and sometimes under $15. Talyors, Fonseca, Warre's, Graham's and so on. Just try them until you find one you like.Ruby port tends to be a little cheaper still, but be careful here, many of then are not that good.Tawny is red port that is aged in barrel and that takes on a brownish color and gets slightly oxidized. The longer it's aged, the more it costs. I quite like it, but the better bottligns can get very...
too lean because of hibernation?
According to one of my old cookbooks, it was a traditional hunter's feast in rural France.
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