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Posts by chogall

 Well, there's the behind teh veil thread for shoe constructions, the leather thread, and the shoemaking techniques thread. I am just trying to make these threads more inclusive to different styles of shoemaking as oppose to only discussions on hand sewn welted shoemaking (less lastmaking and tree making)...
Depends on the maker IMO. SC is nicely finished so not much wax is needed. Meermin or Vass are not so they could take on a lot of wax. But yes, mirror the fuck out of the toe caps, heels, and shoe waist area to prevent scratches.
 Yup.  Thus my comment it really depends. I went through two bottles of Reno (the old much bigger bottle) and 1 small new Reno bottle before I stopped using Reno for conditioning. I went through the mirror shine everything phase to shoe cream only phase, and now I am back to the heavy wax shine phase again; heavy wax protects shoes much better.
 That's similar to what I was saying.  I dislike marketers for perpetuating the myth that GY welted or hand welted shoes being waterproof or 'relatively' waterproof, when leather itself as a material is NOT waterproof unless treated. And yes, logic would prevail and lead to the conclusion that for inclement weathers, people should own rubber overshoes to cover their leather outsoles and/or beater shoes with rubber outsoles.  The former I do own but isn't really a good...
 light brown/tan or neutral.
 Really depends. My black/dark brown shoe creams from 2006 are still a quarter full but in the meanwhile I went through two tins of Saphir black polish. The rare colored shoe creams will last literally forever.  I barely used my red, blue and green shoe creams...
 Explain to me, how did insoles of my leather shoes got soaking wet then, via your simple material science.  The list includes RM Williams, Saint Crispins, Vass, John Lobb Paris bespoke.  First is GY welted cork gum filler and the rest are all hand welted w/ cork sheet filler.  Not sure what kind of cements/adhesives were used in them.  All have leather outsoles, which got soaking wet and the water/moisture moves to the welt and the insole. Or are you talking about how...
 Eh, it actually means I am walking better and more balanced since I can don't lose grip w/ less coefficient of friction out soles. My feet sweat quite a lot as well, but water DO sips in through leather insole passing through the supposedly occlusive cork layer.  Downpours in Asia/SE Asia is quite crazy...
 Kiwi is perfectly fine.  But if you are that curious about Saphir, get it...
 That's exact opposite to my experience.  IME Dainite outsoles grips pretty well when wet (rain, not snow).  And more importantly, they kept my feet dry while leather soles, single or double, failed me many times. Leather sole is just a extremely poor choice for wet weathers and overshoes don't really fit in jacket pocket or fanny packs.
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